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Ground contact

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Succasunna, NJ
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[#1] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 04:51:43 AM
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Looking for some help being my computer crashed and it's taking a long time to restore.

Anyone have installation information on EFIS type siding. The EFIS in this area was installed on block. I had siding to ground contact and the seller wrote the following.

Exterior
I I03. Exterior Wall Defect. The siding is in contact with ground at rear basement door area.
The stucco inspector did not have an issue with this area.


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Darren
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Ground contact
[#2] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 05:00:17 AM
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Seeing that it's EIFS on concrete block, I wouldn't either, but I suppose I'd need to see more before I was completely comfortable discounting it.
"This above all: to thine own self be true." - William Shakespeare
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Ground contact
[#3] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 06:22:50 AM
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The fact that structural concrete block is used as substrate is not, in itself, an issue, but that doesn't relieve the importance of a drainage plane where the wall design incorporates a vapor barrier near the interior surface. If no vapor barrier exists elsewhere within the wall structure, then the drainage plane isn't as important since the EIFS polymer coating itself is a barrier, the XPS foam provides most of the insulating qualities and incidental moisture within the block wall can find it's way out via the interior. Paint the interior wall surface and the problem returns.

Marc

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Ground contact
[#4] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 06:59:17 AM
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This manual is very good for installation details:

http://www.eima.com/pdfs/EIMA%..._Web.pdf

http://www.eima.com/technicalt...delines/

Item Description: Termination Above Finished Grade

Function: A gap should be maintained between EIFS and the finished grade. The gap must be wide enough to allow access for visual inspection and treatment of the foundation for pest control.

Guidelines: Where access to the foundation is not required for visual inspection or treatment for pest control, the EIFS can remain in place.

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Ground contact
[#5] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 07:48:37 AM
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Depends on whether it's a barrier system or a water-managed system.

If you've got a wood-frame house on a block foundation and have applied the EIFS all the way to grade, there can be a water-managed system used over the frame portion and then a barrier system can be used on the block portion. You'd need to have a weep screed where the water-managed system ends and the barrier system begins; otherwise, you risk water backing up into the water managed system in the event some sealant fails somewhere around a window or door penetration.

If it's a water-managed system over both the frame and the block foundation and that system extends all the way to the base of the wall, there needs to be a weep screed at the bottom of the wall and there needs to be two inches of clearance between the bottom of the EIFS and any hardscaping and six inches of clearance between the bottom of the EIFS and grade.

If it's a block structure from eave to grade that's been covered with a barrier type system I don't think there's an issue. If it's a block structure from eave to grade with a water-managed system covering it, it needs to have a way for water to leave the lamina as Marc has explained above.

Bottom line, water-managed systems need a way to drain, barrier systems should only be used over non-organic and where the two are mixed the water-managed system must still be able to drain.

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Mike

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[#6] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 08:54:03 AM
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Mike,

I am curios where did you get the 6 in. requirement to grade?

Ramon

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[#7] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 09:58:21 AM
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From the EIFS Inspection Maintenance and Repair Guide by Robert G. Thomas Jr. Thomas was with Dryvit for a couple of decades before he opened his own company TMD Associates an EIFS consulting firm. He was - don't know if he still is - chairman of the ASTM committee E6.58 on EIFS and he's a contributing editor to Walls & Ceiling Magazine. In his book, Thomas says,

"EIFS is not a below-grade insulation system and does not perform well as such. It is not sufficiently robust to keep water out, and it will deteriorate if left in damp soil. Also, bugs can get into the EIFS and use the EIFS as a freeway to get into the framing above. This is especially a problem in termite areas. The solution is that the EIFS must be held above the grade. The correct distance is in the 4" to 8" range."

I split the difference.

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Mike

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[#8] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 11:16:40 AM
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Makes sense.
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[#9] Posted: 08/17/2010 - 1:25:41 PM
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Quote: Originally posted by hausdok

Also, bugs can get into the EIFS and use the EIFS as a freeway to get into the framing above. This is especially a problem in termite areas. The solution is that the EIFS must be held above the grade. The correct distance is in the 4" to 8" range."[/i]


I split the difference.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike


That was/is the concern #1 for me. During my classes and testing for my 'Credentialed Wood Destroying Insect Inspector' certification, it was discussed how foam insulation was to be treated exactly like wood; termites love the stuff.

It was amazing the samples of foam that was part of the class.
Darren
Succasunna NJ

New Jersey Home Inspections

"Leave my nose alone Please!" (FZ)
   
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