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  1. Yesterday
  2. Jim Baird

    I triple dog dare ya...

    Like Marc said be sure you know what you are looking for before you head down to the big box. Most of all don't ask the guy at the big box what to do or buy.
  3. Jim Baird

    Sistering Floor joists is this ok??

    ...if all you are doing is making up for that notch you are doing fine. That kind of scabbing can also be done with plywood and screws. Looks like you had plenty of room to swing a hammer down there. I have seen lots of floor joists way overnotched at their very ends that have lasted fifty years without failing.
  4. Jim Baird

    HI Artography - Foil Wallpaper

    ...so who's afraid of a little color in life?
  5. Last week
  6. Chad Fabry

    Hotel Henry Conference Center,

    That place is awesome! We've stayed at historic hotels in Buffalo, but somehow we've missed this one. It takes a while for me to get all the approvals necessary from NY. If you're serious, ( and I hope you are) send me a couple course outlines and I'll get the paperwork going. It'll be an extravaganza!
  7. Jim Katen

    I triple dog dare ya...

    I don't understand. You live in a rented home. Is the owner having this work done or are you having the work done? You say it's "family owned." Does that mean that *a* family owns it or does *your* family own it? Why are you taking apart work in a house that you don't own? Please explain what's actually happening here.
  8. Marc

    I triple dog dare ya...

    What's the plan? Want a suggestion? Get some technical representation on your side of the table. Someone who knows enough about houses to put to paper exactly what needs to happen and to confirm that it does indeed happen. Such language will scare off any future prospective contractor should they turn out to be just another horse arse (with teeth).
  9. MavenOfReputation

    I triple dog dare ya...

    I have many many more pics and can upload today’s latest afterbi put on my coveralls and head to Home Depot. I an most concerned for support under the bathroom as it was an old addition to a Pony Express weighing station, and the house is on slab until this bath and deck were added in. Termites and water every which way.
  10. MavenOfReputation

    I triple dog dare ya...

    00F877C4-98B0-48F9-9200-87CB06BE50B4.MOV I live in a rented bungalow that is family owned. Three contractors later, several thousands of dollars either wasted or stolen, I have decided that the job is never going to be done, but a girl needs a bathroom. Upon the exit of the last horses arse building (non)professional, who managed to sheetrock over his handiwork in a hurry, implore you all to see why I opened up the walls and floor to see what the hell the “new subfloor and bathroom” were actually built like, and oh, the horrors...how can I go forward? I have my plan, which does not include lighting a match or moving just yet. 00F877C4-98B0-48F9-9200-87CB06BE50B4.MOV handiwork from hell
  11. Jim Katen

    HI Artography - Foil Wallpaper

    I need a Dramamine.
  12. Jim Katen

    Furnace Plug/Knockout Required?

    Was it located in a conditioned space? If it's in an unconditioned space, I'd seal the open unused plug (and the condensate line cleanout opening). Otherwise, I wouldn't care. Was it set up as direct vent or non-direct vent? If it's a direct vent setup, I'd seal the unused openings at the burner compartment because only outdoor air is supposed to be there. In a non-direct vent setup, I wouldn't bother.
  13. greyboy39

    Furnace Plug/Knockout Required?

    Saw an open condensate line plug and open knockout (correct me if my terminology is lacking) on a forced air Cat IV furnace this morning. Are there any requirements from most manufacturers as to plugging an unused condensate plug? Furthermore, any requirements from manufacturers in covering unused knockouts on the furnace cabinet? If so on either count what adverse effects can they cause. And yes, i do see the manufacturers installation instructions sitting on top of the furnace and did consult them, I wasn't able to determine if either was required and or recommended. Thanks in advance!
  14. Jim Katen

    Sistering Floor joists is this ok??

    It ain't goin' nowhere.
  15. Bill Kibbel

    Sistering Floor joists is this ok??

    I would prefer glue and screw. Some engineers here insist on bolts.
  16. Hey Chad, I gotta check this place out. Lets put together a couple days of classes here. Adaptive reuse of a former insane asylum in Buffallo, NY
  17. I'm sistering some knotched floor joists in my house. I'm using 3 1/2in 16D nails spacing them 6-8in apart on the board with 3 nails in each column so approximately 21 nails per 4ft board. The nails do stick out the other side of the floor joist and I read elsewhere that this is fine. So for those that have done this kind of work before do these pictures look like everything is good? Does it not matter that the original floor joist kinda loses a bit of wood as the nail punches through the other side?
  18. Earlier
  19. Tom Raymond

    This ladder still OK?

    Everyone in the inspector groups on Facebook always recommended the 17' little giant or Werner. I find that size hard to handle. It's too big when I need a small ladder and too short when I need a big one. I carry 300# rated Werner folders, 15' and 22'. If I need to make more than one trip or plan to spend more than a few minutes at height I grab a real extension ladder. They are far more comfortable to hang out on, and easier to set up. I wouldn't be worried about Denny's ladder as a step, but I wouldn't be comfortable on it fully extended.
  20. Jim Katen

    This ladder still OK?

    One of the problems with that much wear in the joint is that the fully extended ladder wants to rock back & forth across its range of movement. Several years ago, someone posted a video of a guy who fell for exactly that reason. He had the ladder sticking up several feet above the edge of the roof and as he climbed it, he pushed forward on the top of the ladder, which caused the top to rock forward, the middle to rock out, and the bottom to pop out from under him.
  21. Jim Katen

    This ladder still OK?

    They don't carry the 13-footer, which is my favorite length. They also don't take online orders. For now, I'm fine with my Werners. But if I ever need another, I'll definitely give them a call. Look at the gal in the picture again. She's using it in an unequal step ladder mode.
  22. John Kogel

    This ladder still OK?

    You're welcome to visit us anytime, Jim, but I found a US website here: https://www.idealproductusa.com/Catalog-of-products/Jaws-Ladders.shtml The knuckle joint locks into position with tapered teeth and two big wingnuts hold the jaws tight. The picture show a gal with her ladder angle way off. She could use a hand. 😎
  23. Marc

    This ladder still OK?

    I'd be concerned with that much wear, regardless of what the manufacturer said. It's me that's climbing up the thing. What Tom said.
  24. Tom Raymond

    This ladder still OK?

    I would tell the rep to climb it first.
  25. Les

    This ladder still OK?

    Denny, I would not use it. But I am old and, like Chad, have an aversion to falling. Biggest field issue I have with inspectors is their use of ladders. Always too horizontal.
  26. Wengero14

    Social Media Tutorials

    That’s great! Even I want to attend a seminar like this. It is very important to know about all seo services in today’s time. It was nice coming across this post. I believe sticking to this post is going to give me more information related to these services and techniques.
  27. Jim Katen

    This ladder still OK?

    As far as I know, we can't buy Jaws ladders south of the border. I'd have to drive up to BC to pick one up.
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