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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/16/2020 in all areas

  1. T'was 6 days before Christmas, and all through the town, people wore masks, that covered their frown. The frown had begun way back in the spring when a global pandemic changed everything. They called it corona, but unlike the beer, It didn’t bring good times, it didn’t bring cheer. Airplanes were grounded, travel was banned. Borders were closed across air, sea, and land. As the world entered lockdown to flatten the curve, the economy halted, and folks lost their nerve. From March to July we rode the first wave, people stayed home, they tried to behave. When summer emerged the lockdown wa
    6 points
  2. At first I thought Jim, you're waxing poetic, Then saw it's a copy, but not 'til I'd read it, Beginning to end, Did he do that on purpose? No matter, it did bring some cheer to this carcass, Here's wishing y'all a Merry Olde Christmas! 😃
    2 points
  3. 1 point
  4. Let me translate. "I'm a link dropper from Kakinada, India and I copy & past useless stuff on forums so saps will pay me for website SEO".
    1 point
  5. For large openings. For small openings, stainless steel wool works great. The mice will not chew on it because it makes their fillings hurt.
    1 point
  6. Same as Jim. If a critter can't fit, you must omit.
    1 point
  7. Here's an idea: Instead of advising your inspectors to *never* exceed the standards, I suggest introducing the concept of "tactical exceedance." Begin by including a statement like this in the inspection agreement, "The inspector may occasionally exceed the standard of practice as a courtesy to the customer, who agrees that, in doing so, the inspector will not exceed the standard in every regard or in every instance." Or something like that. I'm sure that your lawyers can get the gist across. Then, inspectors can feel a bit more free to perform risk assessments to decide when
    1 point
  8. I think your just plain wrong here. There are, of course, times when those conflicts are present, but they're rare. In the vast majority of instances, the thing that best protects the inspector is for him or her to do that thing that best serves the customer. In other words, cover the client's butt and yours will be covered automatically. By the way, the people who framed the original standard of practice for this profession clearly intended for that standard to be a *minimum*, not a maximum. An inspection report that doesn't exceed the standard of practice is a piss-poor report.
    1 point
  9. That approach is designed to avoid the situation that would bring the insurance company into the picture in the first place. It's unreasonable to expect an insurance company to adopt such an approach as policy. Having said that, the number of substantial client complaints I've had in over 16 years can be counted on the fingers of one hand. I credit that on satisfying whatever client needs I can reasonably offer, even if it means exceeding the SOP. The SOP, without an educational standard and a mandated writing style to go with it, is a ridiculous standard upon which to base a quali
    1 point
  10. Strikes me as a word best avoided by northerners - in fact, probably, anyone outside of southern LA - unless they want to sound like posers. I'll stick to the insults indigenous to my own upbringing: moron, shithead, dumbass, or the ever reliable cocksuckinmotherfukintwoballedbitchinbastardasshole
    1 point
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