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  1. 5 points
    Taking photos is like choosing words. Adding many more doesn't fix the few well chosen ones that you missed. You may have much experience in claims but you're at the tail end trying to fix something. We're at the beginning trying to create that something.
  2. 4 points
    I heard of one inspector who saw the note on the front door not to let the cat out. When he was finishing up and went outside and then came back, the cat was on the front porch. He put the cat back in the house and left. Wasn't their cat; cat destroyed the drapes, furniture, etc.
  3. 4 points
    a pleasant reminder of my good sense in divorcing my first wife.
  4. 4 points
  5. 3 points
    My 4 1/2 minutes of fame.
  6. 3 points
  7. 3 points
    A 32' commercial grade extension ladder will probably get you to the roof of more than 90% of American homes. It is also considerably more durable and cheaper than a drone. They weigh about 65 pounds, making them about as heavy as a fourth-grader and much easier to handle. Also, on a residential home inspection, the use of ladders is not subject to federal oversight, another attribute weighing in their favor. So why mess around with drones?
  8. 3 points
    I've always found it odd that we dig a round hole in the ground, call it a well, and expect it to produce water. Then we dig a square hole in the ground, call it a basement, and expect it to stay dry.
  9. 3 points
    In California, toothpaste causes cancer. So does the box that it comes in. This concludes my rant.
  10. 2 points
    Will you still be glad that you shopped around when you someday have a claim that they refuse to cover?
  11. 2 points
    Hi Steven, If you want to enjoy what you do, and want to be at it for a long time, don't feed at the realtor trough. Most agents have only their own interest at heart; and, if your inspection doesn't fit what they want, they'll fight you every step of the way and try to remake you into what they want. With a different agent on every home, with different likes and dislikes, that can cause you a whole lot of stress that you don't need. Or, they can simply toss your card, nod and smile at your and accept whatever swag you want to try and bribe them with and still forget you. (Below, I'll tell you how to get started with agents - no, it won't be hypocritical - anything but. You'll see.). Figure out how you're going to do your inspections; and then, from day one, do them that way no matter what. As Jim remarked above, some agents will like you and some won't, so if you are consistent and thorough and concentrate on good customer service skills with your real customers - the buyers (Most of the time). Agents that are truly concerned about their clients and who want a good inspection will remember you - the rest can go sit on a salt block for all I care. The biggest reason folks feed at the realtor trough is that they believe that there is no other cost-effective way to market directly to the consumer. It's BS. I know because I started in '96 and quit marketing to agents 9 months into this business. If one can't succeed in this gig without marketing to agents, how did I manage to keep at it for 23 years when 80% of all new inspectors leave the business after only two years? Flyers? Newspaper ads? Radio? Television? Yellow Pages? Constantly visiting agent offices and dropping off gifts? Spending 16 to 20 hours a week going to brokers opens? Nah, none of that - I literally spent about $20 bucks a year on marketing - what it cost to have a thousand business cards printed up by Vistaprint, and I haven't crossed the threshold of a real estate office (except to talk to my agent about my own home buying) since about 1998. You have to think outside of the box that most home inspection trainers, real estate agents and established inspectors will try to keep you in. Before you start officially, do some inspections on the homes of your friends - as many as you can. Find out where you are comfortable and where you need to do some more studying. Establish a comfortable rhythm and then stick to it. Decide on a report format and use each of those practice inspections to get comfortable with whatever method you are using to write your reports. When you are ready to start, go by realtor offices in your area and strike up a friendly relationship with the receptionists. Your object will be to find one that will be willing to provide you a copy of the schedule of the brokers' open houses. It took me about ten offices, where I casually left little gifts with the receptionists along with my card before I found one who was willing to provide me a bootleg copy of the weekly schedule of brokers opens. For the next few months, I dropped in on her every Monday morning, chatted with her for about five minutes and left her a little box of candy. Like clockwork, when the schedule for the brokers opens came out, she'd fax the thing over to me. (After I got up and running, I didn't need her lists anymore, so I stopped visiting and didn't have to drop off any more poggey bait for her). On brokers open days, go by and visit as many as you can. Don't hang out and try to suckup like so many do - that is only going to give them the opportunity to interrogate you to find out what you are all about. For most, that means determining whether you are malleable and not a deal killer. Don't give them that chance. Just stop in, say hi, introduce yourself, tell 'em that you know they have their own preferred group of inspectors they like to work with, but that you are betting that, once they've worked with you just one time, they're either going to add you to that list or bump someone else. Then look at your watch, tell 'em you have to go because you've got an inspection to get to, and get the hell out of there. Most of them will act like you've got a hole in your head. Don't try to convince them, just be matter of fact and, as you're going out the door, say something like, "Seriously, it'll only take one time and I know you're going to want to have me on that list. Don't think so? I dare you to refer to one of your clients one time. You'll see." It's like tossing chum into the water for sharks - they get curious and want to investigate. Figure that most are going to wait until you are out of sight and then they'll toss your card - but a few will keep it. How fast one or more of them actually take you up on the dare depends on how many you manage to bait. For me, I got my first bite using that technique later in the same week. She was what I call a realtorzoid - a manipulative b***h that didn't care anymore about her clients than she did about a bug on a windshield. I arrived on-site, did my thing with the client and contract and got started. All during the inspection, she kept trying to catch my eye and kept sending me body English clues that she wanted me to pick up on - I ignored all of them. As the length of the inspection went past the length she expected me to be there, she started getting fidgety and kept looking at her watch. She even tried pointing at her wristwatch while standing behind the client where I could see her while I was talking to the client. I ignored her. At the end of the inspection, I could tell by the look in her eyes that I'd never hear from her again, but I didn't care - I had gotten a job and got paid and I knew that I'd hear from the client again and the client's friends and relatives. So, what did I do there? I did a bait and switch on her. When I stopped into her open house and dared her to refer me, I left her with the impression that I'd be her guy, and, to verify it, she took the dare and referred me the one time that I needed her to. It put a fee in my pocket, food on my table and I was able to identify a 'zoid and knew what to expect on the off chance that she'd call me again one day (See did, years later - to inspect a home for a client who was a powerful local litigation attorney. In that case she wanted thorough and careful.). You continue doing this for as long as you need to in order to stay afloat long enough to get on the list of agents that don't expect you to feed at their trough. You are mining - mining for honest non-manipulative agents that have their client's interests at heart and will most-probably refer you in the future. Are you making enemies? Sure - but you don't need them as friends. Afraid they'll run back to their offices and drop a dime on you and nobody from that office will ever want to refer anyone to you ever? So what? If they are that kind of office you don't need their BS anyway - best you learn it early. Besides, I found that even in those offices with the most manipulative agents there were always one or two who, hearing the other agent bellyache, had jotted down my name and called me later on. A few even told me about how upset the other agent had been with me and told me it was because of that they'd referred me to their clients. That's the kind of referral you want - not one that you got because you were sucking up, feeding at their trough and putting up with their b**ls**t. Now, while you are doing the bait and switch, build the foundation for your business. Everyone today is on social media. Get yourself a FB page and learn to use it to your best advantage. If you aren't familiar with it, take a night course at your local community college on FB marketing and web placement. There are other similar platforms. I haven't bothered to use them 'cuz I don't need to. You can explore them too. Go to Google and search "The largest employers in (list your area) and take down that list. Then, starting with the one that employs the most people, find out if they have some kind of intranet forum (similar to this one) where they talk to each other. It used to be that only really large employers like Microsoft, Google, G.E., G.M., Ford, etc. had those, but these days just about every moderately-sized employer has them. It can even be a private, company-only group on FB as well as a dedicated back room on their company website. Figure out where you are going to price your work. Don't make the mistake of low-balling. If you start off as a bottom feeder, you'll always be a bottom feeder, and, most of the time you'll end up doing the kinds of inspections home inspectors hate. Find out who the ten top HI companies are in your area, find out what they charge, calculate the average price for an inspection and then add $50. Then, as people begin calling you to talk about scheduling an appointment get to know a little bit about them so that you'll know what kind of a customer you'll have and will be prepared on the day of the inspection to either deal with someone who hasn't the faintest idea how a home is built or how they work or you'll be dealing with someone who is good with his or her hands and once worked construction. While you are finding that out, find out where they work. If the person works for one of those large employers that has an internal forum of some sort when it comes time to discuss pricing, give them the quote but then ask if they want to save $50. They'll never say no. Explain that, after you've completed your inspection, if they like the thoroughness of the inspection, and if, after receiving the written report, they like the completeness of the report, they'd be willing to tell their fellow employees at such-and-such-company about your little company, you'd be willing to take $50 off the price of the inspection. I've never had one say they were not willing to do that. I've had a few ask, "Well, what if I don't like the inspection or the report - will I have to pay the extra $50?" I just smiled and told them I was sure that wasn't going to be the case, but, if they did not like my work they did not have to post anything and the price reduction still went. It starts off slow but then it speeds up. Before you know it, if you are consistent and you are diligent about having those folks tell their fellow workers about you by putting the name of your company on that internal message board where they can always come back and find it again, you'll be getting calls from folks who called you because they know they'll not only get an awesome inspection, but because they'll know that all they'll have to do is share some info about you on social media and they'll get $50 off the price of the inspection. In 2008 - 2009, when over 15,000 agents a month were losing their shirts and getting out of real estate, a whole lot of inspectors who feed at the trough went along with them. Without those agents, they had no idea what to do and they lost their shirts. I know one guy who had several investment properties - he had to sell one at a loss in order to keep his head above water. At the same time, because I'd concentrated on the largest employers in my area, when other homeowners began losing their homes many of those employees were in a position to purchase those bank-owned properties at fire sale prices and they called me up - sometimes to inspect two or three jobs in a row as they searched for investment properties. Instead of worrying about where the next job was coming because of the recession, I was referring jobs to other inspectors because I was booked and couldn't handle the additional work. It's a business where you have to play the long game and you have to do it like a pro. If you start off begging for work and selling your time at lowball prices, that's where you'll always be - going hat in hand to the agents and doing POS homes. Concentrate on the solid employers with well-paid employees who have staying power and accept referrals from honest agents instead of from 'zoids and you'll still be around years from now. ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!! Mike
  12. 2 points
    We have the dates set- March 21-23 at Hotel Henry. Les, this going to be 24 hours of real education- zero fluff. Proving the commitment to quality, Bill Kibbel is on board. Speakers to be announced as they confirm.
  13. 2 points
    "If it leaks slower than it evaporates from the rag, then it's an evaporative cooler." From the book, "Things Realtors Say".
  14. 2 points
    I think we can make the numbers work. Bill has contributed tons of ideas. Between us we contacted: Kenny Hart, Glen Mathewson, John Bouldin, Frank Woeste, Don Norman, Lstiburek and Joe Tedesco, I'd love to have Douglas Hansen if I can convince him to come. If you guys have any suggestions for presenters, please post them here and we'll consider them. The venue will provide 24 hours of ASHI, NY, MA, and by default, PA CEU's. Working on CT, NJ and OH. If there are vendors you'd like to come, share those thoughts. This is a chance to build the conference you want to attend. Room rates at the Henry are reduced to $130 with free parking. If we pull it off, the conference will provide breakfast, beverage service for the day(s), and a nice lunch. Tentatively planned for late February, early March 2020
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    Horrible state to live in, but Chicago is wonderful. . .
  17. 2 points
    Damn. Now I have to review my company's safety protocols for romaine lettuce.
  18. 2 points
    Ladder climbing does involve risk. So does showering, walking indoors, walking outdoors -especially in winter, removing electrical panel covers, standing near a water heater whose TPRV lacks a decent discharge pipe, operating furnaces, eating romaine lettuce, driving to and from inspections, and opening emails. In every case, a bit of knowledge and training greatly mitigates that risk. Come on.
  19. 2 points
    Well stated, Jim. You also need access to maintain stone foundation walls. http://historicbldgs.com/stonefoundations.htm
  20. 2 points
  21. 2 points
    I also give general ranges. I really do try to get it "right", but sometimes miss the total by hundreds or thousands of dollars. For example - the house has a negative grade. I report it. I tell them it can be a week end project for you or it could be 8-900 dollars. they get a landscape artist and it costs 4,000 dollars. But, they had more done than my minimalist estimate. I and other inspectors in my company have never had serious blowback from giving estimates. My least favorite is water heaters. Around here they can be from 800 to 4000 on any given day. If I really don't know the price range of a furnace, I should brush up on my inspector skill set.
  22. 2 points
  23. 2 points
    I guess after the first few misses it didn't really matter.
  24. 2 points
  25. 2 points
  26. 2 points
  27. 2 points
    Yes, good article and good responses. When I was actively inspecting, I took 80 to 180 pics per house. They are filed by date, simple. A few times, I had to pull up pics to back up my report. Replaying the shots in sequence is like reliving the inspection, and it refreshes the memory. I had a guy try, and fail, to lay a claim 2 full years after the inspection. He saw 50 pics in the report, but I had saved 160, showing walls and ceilings in all the rooms, water flowing out of faucets, etc. One thing I recommend is a notepad or just a scrap of paper and a short pencil stub in a pocket. Write down the significant deficiencies as you find them. Sometimes when writing the report, the picture you took earlier can get lost in the shuffle. A glance at the note while writing takes a couple of seconds, a quick check of the report before sending.
  28. 2 points
    I didn't know that McDonald was still manufacturing cats.
  29. 1 point
    Ooooooh, gee wiz! Did I say just a few things wrong or or everything wrong in that post? Please, excuse me if it seemed like I was attempting to brag about my high mileage, second owner, used, POS that I bought to use as my business truck. I guess what I was getting at is that any truck will do as long as its dependable and presentable and is good. on gas.
  30. 1 point
    Thankyou Mycakers, much appreciated. Mark, my favorite nephew ( I have 6 adult nephews) is engaged to the sellers daughter. They have lived in the home for past 7 years. My nephew was complaining about all the seperate specialist sent for inspections and about the repair man who made some small repairs causing more damage than he fixed. My nephew has been in constuction trades for years and knows how repairs should be done. He asked me to come over and inspect the crawl and the few repairs that guy did. So he could give his future father-in-law my opinion. I am not a licenced pest control person, but I am well trained and certainly know the diff between wood rot from water damage and pest damage. when I use the defaut font I can't even see what I'm typing. hmmmmm.
  31. 1 point
    My uncle is a licensed and insured handy man. He swears buy his pick up with an extended cab plus a bed cap. He made an extension that slides out of the bed so that he can get at his tools in the back. It also doubles as an onsite work bench. I have always liked the idea of sprinter vans myself. Roof rack for ladders and materials. I'd definitely go for the hammock idea. Nothing says pro handyman like taking a nap on your lunch break.
  32. 1 point
    If you frame the last one you could get big bucks.
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    Perhaps they had to replace an original 5 ton system and thought at one time that they could get the equivalent of a two-speed AC by paralleling two smaller systems. This would work AFAIK. If they were smart, the 2 air flows are in parallel because they were each engineered for that sort of delta temp. If they're in series, I'd write them.
  35. 1 point
    I am a tool guy. I vote for number one .
  36. 1 point
    When I was a kid, a friend and I stuffed a 16 hp engine into a suspensionless mini bike. We had to drill a hole in the seat to install the spark plug. Following an unfortunate incident, we added padding to isolate the spark plug from the seated rider. Luckily, my friend was later able to father children.
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    I'll stand on Marc's head for him.
  39. 1 point
    I should not like this, but I do!
  40. 1 point
    Yeah, that seems about right. Ok. On the subject of cost. A Parrot Anafi would do the job very well for about $650 on sale. Autel EVO for around $850. Both are stable in winds, and the EVO will fly in light rains. These are certainly options. Taking a closeup shot series at 12MP or higher will reveal plenty when you can’t, or won’t, go on a roof. Safety comes before any inspection report. You get no awards for risking your life.
  41. 1 point
    I hear this all the time, and I always tell people that it's a bad idea. Here's why: You have a 1940s basement that was never designed and built to be waterproof. Attempting to make it waterproof now will suck a lot of money from your wallet, might or might not work, and could cause unforeseen consequences - such as damage to your foundation. It's a recipe for disappointment and unhappiness. My best advice: Align your expectations with the reality that you have a 1940s basement. Maintain your gutters and downspouts, direct all downspout water well away from the house, adjust the grade in your yard so that the soil slopes away from the house for at least 10', and finish your basement in such a way that occasional water entry won't damage any finishes.
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    This is one rare circumstance where the ASHI Reporter article is correct. With Watts, it's easy. They print that information, almost verbatim, on the little yellow tag attached to every TPR valve. I usually just snap a picture of it. With Cash Acme, it's a bit harder. I wrote to them and they sent me a response, which I quote to anyone who cares. They gave me permission to share that response:
  44. 1 point
    I think India uses the Britiish IET regulations. 😁
  45. 1 point
    I take 400 or so pictures at each inspection too. Sometimes I like to take several different angles of a particular problem so that it can be better explained. Many of them make the report, but nowhere near all. I use the hand signals and establishing photo as my notes as well. It costs nothing extra and takes very little time. I'd rather have too many pictures instead of too few.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    Agent is an idiot (THERE ... I've said it). Also your client does not know what the difference is between an inspector and an appraiser. Tell them to contact the appraiser for those measurements. No ... it is not something an inspector should do or be expected to do.
  48. 1 point
    The clients are wrong and the realtor is either a greenhorn or on meds. However, you could offer to return to the condo and measure it for an hourly fee. Maybe learn to combine appraisals with inspections, why not?
  49. 1 point
    As much as I'd like to participate in some Facebook groups, I find that Facebook just rubs my fur the wrong way. After more than a few minutes, I've got to close it and go breathe some fresh air. I'd love to hear more from John & Michael, but it's not going to happen on Facebook. . .
  50. 1 point
    I have been with the InspectorPro program (Citadel Insurance Services, LC) for more than a few years, rate keeps going down as the years go by. I'm happy.
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