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  1. 5 points
    Taking photos is like choosing words. Adding many more doesn't fix the few well chosen ones that you missed. You may have much experience in claims but you're at the tail end trying to fix something. We're at the beginning trying to create that something.
  2. 4 points
    I heard of one inspector who saw the note on the front door not to let the cat out. When he was finishing up and went outside and then came back, the cat was on the front porch. He put the cat back in the house and left. Wasn't their cat; cat destroyed the drapes, furniture, etc.
  3. 4 points
    a pleasant reminder of my good sense in divorcing my first wife.
  4. 4 points
  5. 3 points
    My 4 1/2 minutes of fame.
  6. 3 points
    A 32' commercial grade extension ladder will probably get you to the roof of more than 90% of American homes. It is also considerably more durable and cheaper than a drone. They weigh about 65 pounds, making them about as heavy as a fourth-grader and much easier to handle. Also, on a residential home inspection, the use of ladders is not subject to federal oversight, another attribute weighing in their favor. So why mess around with drones?
  7. 3 points
    I've always found it odd that we dig a round hole in the ground, call it a well, and expect it to produce water. Then we dig a square hole in the ground, call it a basement, and expect it to stay dry.
  8. 2 points
    Hi Steven, If you want to enjoy what you do, and want to be at it for a long time, don't feed at the realtor trough. Most agents have only their own interest at heart; and, if your inspection doesn't fit what they want, they'll fight you every step of the way and try to remake you into what they want. With a different agent on every home, with different likes and dislikes, that can cause you a whole lot of stress that you don't need. Or, they can simply toss your card, nod and smile at your and accept whatever swag you want to try and bribe them with and still forget you. (Below, I'll tell you how to get started with agents - no, it won't be hypocritical - anything but. You'll see.). Figure out how you're going to do your inspections; and then, from day one, do them that way no matter what. As Jim remarked above, some agents will like you and some won't, so if you are consistent and thorough and concentrate on good customer service skills with your real customers - the buyers (Most of the time). Agents that are truly concerned about their clients and who want a good inspection will remember you - the rest can go sit on a salt block for all I care. The biggest reason folks feed at the realtor trough is that they believe that there is no other cost-effective way to market directly to the consumer. It's BS. I know because I started in '96 and quit marketing to agents 9 months into this business. If one can't succeed in this gig without marketing to agents, how did I manage to keep at it for 23 years when 80% of all new inspectors leave the business after only two years? Flyers? Newspaper ads? Radio? Television? Yellow Pages? Constantly visiting agent offices and dropping off gifts? Spending 16 to 20 hours a week going to brokers opens? Nah, none of that - I literally spent about $20 bucks a year on marketing - what it cost to have a thousand business cards printed up by Vistaprint, and I haven't crossed the threshold of a real estate office (except to talk to my agent about my own home buying) since about 1998. You have to think outside of the box that most home inspection trainers, real estate agents and established inspectors will try to keep you in. Before you start officially, do some inspections on the homes of your friends - as many as you can. Find out where you are comfortable and where you need to do some more studying. Establish a comfortable rhythm and then stick to it. Decide on a report format and use each of those practice inspections to get comfortable with whatever method you are using to write your reports. When you are ready to start, go by realtor offices in your area and strike up a friendly relationship with the receptionists. Your object will be to find one that will be willing to provide you a copy of the schedule of the brokers' open houses. It took me about ten offices, where I casually left little gifts with the receptionists along with my card before I found one who was willing to provide me a bootleg copy of the weekly schedule of brokers opens. For the next few months, I dropped in on her every Monday morning, chatted with her for about five minutes and left her a little box of candy. Like clockwork, when the schedule for the brokers opens came out, she'd fax the thing over to me. (After I got up and running, I didn't need her lists anymore, so I stopped visiting and didn't have to drop off any more poggey bait for her). On brokers open days, go by and visit as many as you can. Don't hang out and try to suckup like so many do - that is only going to give them the opportunity to interrogate you to find out what you are all about. For most, that means determining whether you are malleable and not a deal killer. Don't give them that chance. Just stop in, say hi, introduce yourself, tell 'em that you know they have their own preferred group of inspectors they like to work with, but that you are betting that, once they've worked with you just one time, they're either going to add you to that list or bump someone else. Then look at your watch, tell 'em you have to go because you've got an inspection to get to, and get the hell out of there. Most of them will act like you've got a hole in your head. Don't try to convince them, just be matter of fact and, as you're going out the door, say something like, "Seriously, it'll only take one time and I know you're going to want to have me on that list. Don't think so? I dare you to refer to one of your clients one time. You'll see." It's like tossing chum into the water for sharks - they get curious and want to investigate. Figure that most are going to wait until you are out of sight and then they'll toss your card - but a few will keep it. How fast one or more of them actually take you up on the dare depends on how many you manage to bait. For me, I got my first bite using that technique later in the same week. She was what I call a realtorzoid - a manipulative b***h that didn't care anymore about her clients than she did about a bug on a windshield. I arrived on-site, did my thing with the client and contract and got started. All during the inspection, she kept trying to catch my eye and kept sending me body English clues that she wanted me to pick up on - I ignored all of them. As the length of the inspection went past the length she expected me to be there, she started getting fidgety and kept looking at her watch. She even tried pointing at her wristwatch while standing behind the client where I could see her while I was talking to the client. I ignored her. At the end of the inspection, I could tell by the look in her eyes that I'd never hear from her again, but I didn't care - I had gotten a job and got paid and I knew that I'd hear from the client again and the client's friends and relatives. So, what did I do there? I did a bait and switch on her. When I stopped into her open house and dared her to refer me, I left her with the impression that I'd be her guy, and, to verify it, she took the dare and referred me the one time that I needed her to. It put a fee in my pocket, food on my table and I was able to identify a 'zoid and knew what to expect on the off chance that she'd call me again one day (See did, years later - to inspect a home for a client who was a powerful local litigation attorney. In that case she wanted thorough and careful.). You continue doing this for as long as you need to in order to stay afloat long enough to get on the list of agents that don't expect you to feed at their trough. You are mining - mining for honest non-manipulative agents that have their client's interests at heart and will most-probably refer you in the future. Are you making enemies? Sure - but you don't need them as friends. Afraid they'll run back to their offices and drop a dime on you and nobody from that office will ever want to refer anyone to you ever? So what? If they are that kind of office you don't need their BS anyway - best you learn it early. Besides, I found that even in those offices with the most manipulative agents there were always one or two who, hearing the other agent bellyache, had jotted down my name and called me later on. A few even told me about how upset the other agent had been with me and told me it was because of that they'd referred me to their clients. That's the kind of referral you want - not one that you got because you were sucking up, feeding at their trough and putting up with their b**ls**t. Now, while you are doing the bait and switch, build the foundation for your business. Everyone today is on social media. Get yourself a FB page and learn to use it to your best advantage. If you aren't familiar with it, take a night course at your local community college on FB marketing and web placement. There are other similar platforms. I haven't bothered to use them 'cuz I don't need to. You can explore them too. Go to Google and search "The largest employers in (list your area) and take down that list. Then, starting with the one that employs the most people, find out if they have some kind of intranet forum (similar to this one) where they talk to each other. It used to be that only really large employers like Microsoft, Google, G.E., G.M., Ford, etc. had those, but these days just about every moderately-sized employer has them. It can even be a private, company-only group on FB as well as a dedicated back room on their company website. Figure out where you are going to price your work. Don't make the mistake of low-balling. If you start off as a bottom feeder, you'll always be a bottom feeder, and, most of the time you'll end up doing the kinds of inspections home inspectors hate. Find out who the ten top HI companies are in your area, find out what they charge, calculate the average price for an inspection and then add $50. Then, as people begin calling you to talk about scheduling an appointment get to know a little bit about them so that you'll know what kind of a customer you'll have and will be prepared on the day of the inspection to either deal with someone who hasn't the faintest idea how a home is built or how they work or you'll be dealing with someone who is good with his or her hands and once worked construction. While you are finding that out, find out where they work. If the person works for one of those large employers that has an internal forum of some sort when it comes time to discuss pricing, give them the quote but then ask if they want to save $50. They'll never say no. Explain that, after you've completed your inspection, if they like the thoroughness of the inspection, and if, after receiving the written report, they like the completeness of the report, they'd be willing to tell their fellow employees at such-and-such-company about your little company, you'd be willing to take $50 off the price of the inspection. I've never had one say they were not willing to do that. I've had a few ask, "Well, what if I don't like the inspection or the report - will I have to pay the extra $50?" I just smiled and told them I was sure that wasn't going to be the case, but, if they did not like my work they did not have to post anything and the price reduction still went. It starts off slow but then it speeds up. Before you know it, if you are consistent and you are diligent about having those folks tell their fellow workers about you by putting the name of your company on that internal message board where they can always come back and find it again, you'll be getting calls from folks who called you because they know they'll not only get an awesome inspection, but because they'll know that all they'll have to do is share some info about you on social media and they'll get $50 off the price of the inspection. In 2008 - 2009, when over 15,000 agents a month were losing their shirts and getting out of real estate, a whole lot of inspectors who feed at the trough went along with them. Without those agents, they had no idea what to do and they lost their shirts. I know one guy who had several investment properties - he had to sell one at a loss in order to keep his head above water. At the same time, because I'd concentrated on the largest employers in my area, when other homeowners began losing their homes many of those employees were in a position to purchase those bank-owned properties at fire sale prices and they called me up - sometimes to inspect two or three jobs in a row as they searched for investment properties. Instead of worrying about where the next job was coming because of the recession, I was referring jobs to other inspectors because I was booked and couldn't handle the additional work. It's a business where you have to play the long game and you have to do it like a pro. If you start off begging for work and selling your time at lowball prices, that's where you'll always be - going hat in hand to the agents and doing POS homes. Concentrate on the solid employers with well-paid employees who have staying power and accept referrals from honest agents instead of from 'zoids and you'll still be around years from now. ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!! Mike
  9. 2 points
    We have the dates set- March 21-23 at Hotel Henry. Les, this going to be 24 hours of real education- zero fluff. Proving the commitment to quality, Bill Kibbel is on board. Speakers to be announced as they confirm.
  10. 2 points
    "If it leaks slower than it evaporates from the rag, then it's an evaporative cooler." From the book, "Things Realtors Say".
  11. 2 points
    I think we can make the numbers work. Bill has contributed tons of ideas. Between us we contacted: Kenny Hart, Glen Mathewson, John Bouldin, Frank Woeste, Don Norman, Lstiburek and Joe Tedesco, I'd love to have Douglas Hansen if I can convince him to come. If you guys have any suggestions for presenters, please post them here and we'll consider them. The venue will provide 24 hours of ASHI, NY, MA, and by default, PA CEU's. Working on CT, NJ and OH. If there are vendors you'd like to come, share those thoughts. This is a chance to build the conference you want to attend. Room rates at the Henry are reduced to $130 with free parking. If we pull it off, the conference will provide breakfast, beverage service for the day(s), and a nice lunch. Tentatively planned for late February, early March 2020
  12. 2 points
  13. 2 points
    Horrible state to live in, but Chicago is wonderful. . .
  14. 2 points
    Damn. Now I have to review my company's safety protocols for romaine lettuce.
  15. 2 points
    Ladder climbing does involve risk. So does showering, walking indoors, walking outdoors -especially in winter, removing electrical panel covers, standing near a water heater whose TPRV lacks a decent discharge pipe, operating furnaces, eating romaine lettuce, driving to and from inspections, and opening emails. In every case, a bit of knowledge and training greatly mitigates that risk. Come on.
  16. 2 points
    Well stated, Jim. You also need access to maintain stone foundation walls. http://historicbldgs.com/stonefoundations.htm
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
    I also give general ranges. I really do try to get it "right", but sometimes miss the total by hundreds or thousands of dollars. For example - the house has a negative grade. I report it. I tell them it can be a week end project for you or it could be 8-900 dollars. they get a landscape artist and it costs 4,000 dollars. But, they had more done than my minimalist estimate. I and other inspectors in my company have never had serious blowback from giving estimates. My least favorite is water heaters. Around here they can be from 800 to 4000 on any given day. If I really don't know the price range of a furnace, I should brush up on my inspector skill set.
  19. 2 points
  20. 2 points
  21. 2 points
  22. 2 points
  23. 2 points
    Yes, good article and good responses. When I was actively inspecting, I took 80 to 180 pics per house. They are filed by date, simple. A few times, I had to pull up pics to back up my report. Replaying the shots in sequence is like reliving the inspection, and it refreshes the memory. I had a guy try, and fail, to lay a claim 2 full years after the inspection. He saw 50 pics in the report, but I had saved 160, showing walls and ceilings in all the rooms, water flowing out of faucets, etc. One thing I recommend is a notepad or just a scrap of paper and a short pencil stub in a pocket. Write down the significant deficiencies as you find them. Sometimes when writing the report, the picture you took earlier can get lost in the shuffle. A glance at the note while writing takes a couple of seconds, a quick check of the report before sending.
  24. 2 points
    In California, toothpaste causes cancer. So does the box that it comes in. This concludes my rant.
  25. 1 point
    So, that was a huge mistake on the inspector's part, but probably not for the reason that you're thinking. The inspector should have looked at the presence of mold as a *symptom* of a moisture problem and he should have addressed that problem in his report, with strong advice about how to reduce moisture levels in the attic. After moisture is totally under control, then it might be appropriate to address the mold - maybe. Remember that no matter how much you treat the mold, it'll just come back if you don't fix the problem that caused it in the first place. And if you truly fix the problem, the mold will stop growing anyway. Removing old, dead mold might be a good idea, but it shouldn't be the priority.
  26. 1 point
    Sounds like the moisture that allowed the mold to grow was interior moisture that got into the attic. It's warmer in the interior than the attic in the winter so if that interior air gets into the cold attic, condensation might result, giving old spores what it needs to grow. I don't see what the lack of a firewall between garage and attic has to do with this mold growth.
  27. 1 point
    Little Calumet River, Blue Island, IL
  28. 1 point
    In my area a 2,800 foot ranch would do fine with a 2.5 or 3 ton unit. 5 tons of AC would be absurdly over sized. Chicago can't be all that different, except you probably have a larger de-humidification load. From the air handler's perspective: If the coils are in parallel, then the air handler would simply see this as a regular 5-ton air conditioner. If it's too large for the house, the air is going to be chilled without adequate de-humidification. If the coils are in series, then the air is going to spend more time in contact with cold coil surfaces and this will provide great de-humidification. From the AC perspective: If the coils are in parallel, then they'll work within their normal parameters, but they'll have very short cycles. It'll just behave like any oversized air conditioner. If the coils are in series, then the 2nd one is going to be seeing lower temperatures. You might get freezing and the efficiency of the system will drop. I don't suppose you measured the temperature drop across this thing? If they're in series, the drop should be really high. Bottom line, I have a hard time imagining how this arrangement can be a good thing. It goes back to my old adage, "Unconventional installations behave in unconventional ways." My guess is that this system is not doing what the installer hoped it would do.
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    I am a tool guy. I vote for number one .
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    Everything sounds good. I would really like to convince Mike Twitty and Jim Katen to both attend and present. I envision this entire event as a very congenial exchange of information in the form of education. Everyone should leave their ego at the door and be prepared to be amazed! As you know I have unconventional ideas as to what constitutes education and testing. Recall the old days when we talked about a Travelin' circus of inspectors. Several times I started to put together a symposium of home inspectors and never finished it. One concept I feel strongly about is this should not be a simple rehash of other venues and presenters. Please add me to the communication between you and Bill.
  35. 1 point
    Is he sure? The new exterior LED fixtures have no sockets, just little flat LED disks that might look like "nothing" until you turn on the light. And if it's daytime, the lights might not even work if they have daylight sensors.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    I'm seeing so many big holes in such a small area as to call for a "Don't Tread on Me" banner.
  38. 1 point
    I'm seeing no brace kits. But then I'm not a poet.
  39. 1 point
    What happened the third and fourth times?
  40. 1 point
    Thanks Stephanie. that was an educational post!
  41. 1 point
    three, four, two, one Three is "frame-able" nice
  42. 1 point
    Spendy Costly Expensive There goes your vacation plans Your kid was probably going to drop out of college anyway Whatever it takes to convey the gravity of the situation.
  43. 1 point
    Les (Mr. Smooth) shows up and steals all the women. I'd really like to see this building - an excellent story of preservation/adaptive reuse. I also want to see Buffalo. Dad was born and raised there and started his engineering career at Becco Chemicals. Grandpa Kibbel was a plumber at Niagara Hydroelectric. I just recently discovered my Great Grandfather was the plumbing inspector for Buffalo for about 25 years. He also taught advanced plumbing and heating and wrote a book on plumbing. It turns out I've already read his articles in The Journal of Plumbing and Heating and Mechanical Contracting and Plumbing including the article I read decades ago that really helped me understand gravity hot water heating.
  44. 1 point
    I've met you. Is that possible?
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
    Read this story to see how a single missing comma recently cost a Maine company $10 million. Commas matter. Words matter more. Make sure your reports are written in such a way that they are impossible to misunderstand.
  47. 1 point
    I have been with the InspectorPro program (Citadel Insurance Services, LC) for more than a few years, rate keeps going down as the years go by. I'm happy.
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point
    How does a shim know whether it's a piece or scrap wood or not? Marc
  50. 1 point
    So what I have gleaned from this is; If pool items are not bonded the possible results could be Death! If pool items are bonded it might cost the person some extra $$ to prevent Death! Kind of a no brainier. I don't think you will ever get in trouble for recommending all pool items need to be properly bonded.
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