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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/25/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Taking photos is like choosing words. Adding many more doesn't fix the few well chosen ones that you missed. You may have much experience in claims but you're at the tail end trying to fix something. We're at the beginning trying to create that something.
  2. 4 points
    a pleasant reminder of my good sense in divorcing my first wife.
  3. 4 points
  4. 3 points
    My 4 1/2 minutes of fame.
  5. 3 points
    A 32' commercial grade extension ladder will probably get you to the roof of more than 90% of American homes. It is also considerably more durable and cheaper than a drone. They weigh about 65 pounds, making them about as heavy as a fourth-grader and much easier to handle. Also, on a residential home inspection, the use of ladders is not subject to federal oversight, another attribute weighing in their favor. So why mess around with drones?
  6. 3 points
    I've always found it odd that we dig a round hole in the ground, call it a well, and expect it to produce water. Then we dig a square hole in the ground, call it a basement, and expect it to stay dry.
  7. 2 points
    We have the dates set- March 21-23 at Hotel Henry. Les, this going to be 24 hours of real education- zero fluff. Proving the commitment to quality, Bill Kibbel is on board. Speakers to be announced as they confirm.
  8. 2 points
    "If it leaks slower than it evaporates from the rag, then it's an evaporative cooler." From the book, "Things Realtors Say".
  9. 2 points
    I think we can make the numbers work. Bill has contributed tons of ideas. Between us we contacted: Kenny Hart, Glen Mathewson, John Bouldin, Frank Woeste, Don Norman, Lstiburek and Joe Tedesco, I'd love to have Douglas Hansen if I can convince him to come. If you guys have any suggestions for presenters, please post them here and we'll consider them. The venue will provide 24 hours of ASHI, NY, MA, and by default, PA CEU's. Working on CT, NJ and OH. If there are vendors you'd like to come, share those thoughts. This is a chance to build the conference you want to attend. Room rates at the Henry are reduced to $130 with free parking. If we pull it off, the conference will provide breakfast, beverage service for the day(s), and a nice lunch. Tentatively planned for late February, early March 2020
  10. 2 points
  11. 2 points
    Horrible state to live in, but Chicago is wonderful. . .
  12. 2 points
    Damn. Now I have to review my company's safety protocols for romaine lettuce.
  13. 2 points
    Ladder climbing does involve risk. So does showering, walking indoors, walking outdoors -especially in winter, removing electrical panel covers, standing near a water heater whose TPRV lacks a decent discharge pipe, operating furnaces, eating romaine lettuce, driving to and from inspections, and opening emails. In every case, a bit of knowledge and training greatly mitigates that risk. Come on.
  14. 2 points
    Well stated, Jim. You also need access to maintain stone foundation walls. http://historicbldgs.com/stonefoundations.htm
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    I also give general ranges. I really do try to get it "right", but sometimes miss the total by hundreds or thousands of dollars. For example - the house has a negative grade. I report it. I tell them it can be a week end project for you or it could be 8-900 dollars. they get a landscape artist and it costs 4,000 dollars. But, they had more done than my minimalist estimate. I and other inspectors in my company have never had serious blowback from giving estimates. My least favorite is water heaters. Around here they can be from 800 to 4000 on any given day. If I really don't know the price range of a furnace, I should brush up on my inspector skill set.
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. 2 points
  20. 2 points
  21. 2 points
    Yes, good article and good responses. When I was actively inspecting, I took 80 to 180 pics per house. They are filed by date, simple. A few times, I had to pull up pics to back up my report. Replaying the shots in sequence is like reliving the inspection, and it refreshes the memory. I had a guy try, and fail, to lay a claim 2 full years after the inspection. He saw 50 pics in the report, but I had saved 160, showing walls and ceilings in all the rooms, water flowing out of faucets, etc. One thing I recommend is a notepad or just a scrap of paper and a short pencil stub in a pocket. Write down the significant deficiencies as you find them. Sometimes when writing the report, the picture you took earlier can get lost in the shuffle. A glance at the note while writing takes a couple of seconds, a quick check of the report before sending.
  22. 2 points
    In California, toothpaste causes cancer. So does the box that it comes in. This concludes my rant.
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    Everything sounds good. I would really like to convince Mike Twitty and Jim Katen to both attend and present. I envision this entire event as a very congenial exchange of information in the form of education. Everyone should leave their ego at the door and be prepared to be amazed! As you know I have unconventional ideas as to what constitutes education and testing. Recall the old days when we talked about a Travelin' circus of inspectors. Several times I started to put together a symposium of home inspectors and never finished it. One concept I feel strongly about is this should not be a simple rehash of other venues and presenters. Please add me to the communication between you and Bill.
  25. 1 point
  26. 1 point
    I see dead people.
  27. 1 point
    I'm seeing no brace kits. But then I'm not a poet.
  28. 1 point
    I should not like this, but I do!
  29. 1 point
    Set your phone's text tone to a doorbell. It's a hoot to watch the realtors keep going to the front door during an inspection.
  30. 1 point
    Foreign buyers leave it up to their realtor on this side to take care of the inspection, and sometimes they don't even come to see the house. Even so, the best advice is to refuse to inspect until the contract is read and signed by the buyer. It is even more important to get that signature when you don't meet the buyers face-to-face.
  31. 1 point
    Hey John, I agree with Bill, but would have no problem broaching the orifice. You know what I learned from your post? I spell orifice wrong 99% of the time!
  32. 1 point
    Yeah, that seems about right. Ok. On the subject of cost. A Parrot Anafi would do the job very well for about $650 on sale. Autel EVO for around $850. Both are stable in winds, and the EVO will fly in light rains. These are certainly options. Taking a closeup shot series at 12MP or higher will reveal plenty when you can’t, or won’t, go on a roof. Safety comes before any inspection report. You get no awards for risking your life.
  33. 1 point
    Erby, my first read of your comment was "autistic eye". Mike sees thing we look at.
  34. 1 point
    I'm with Jim. If I know an approximate, I'll tell them. If I don't, I'll tell them I don't and to get a contractor to give them some estimates. People are hiring us for advice and guidance about their home. Why wouldn't we provide all we can. Granted, some inspectors can't provide any advice or guidance other than "Recommend a ___________ further evaluate ______________." But still take their money.
  35. 1 point
    Spendy Costly Expensive There goes your vacation plans Your kid was probably going to drop out of college anyway Whatever it takes to convey the gravity of the situation.
  36. 1 point
    The west foundation wall is bowed inward 2-1/2 inches at it's center. The sump pump worked when I lifted the float. The central support beam is energized with 120 VAC. Without descriptive text to inform the client about the topic in each of the sentences, the client hasn't been informed of anything. Of course you should say things like, "that'll be expensive". Tom Raymond says, "spendy".
  37. 1 point
    Les (Mr. Smooth) shows up and steals all the women. I'd really like to see this building - an excellent story of preservation/adaptive reuse. I also want to see Buffalo. Dad was born and raised there and started his engineering career at Becco Chemicals. Grandpa Kibbel was a plumber at Niagara Hydroelectric. I just recently discovered my Great Grandfather was the plumbing inspector for Buffalo for about 25 years. He also taught advanced plumbing and heating and wrote a book on plumbing. It turns out I've already read his articles in The Journal of Plumbing and Heating and Mechanical Contracting and Plumbing including the article I read decades ago that really helped me understand gravity hot water heating.
  38. 1 point
    I've met you. Is that possible?
  39. 1 point
    nice! I especially like the woman's leg.
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
    I think I can help, Jim. Your problem is that you only have one but they are intended to be placed in pairs. Bad feng shui.
  42. 1 point
    I like the way they just sit on top of the shingles in the happy-go-lucky, carefree way.
  43. 1 point
    I didn't know that McDonald was still manufacturing cats.
  44. 1 point
    I had came across with this issue. I would suggest that you should hire a professional bed bug exterminator service.
  45. 1 point
    Agent is an idiot (THERE ... I've said it). Also your client does not know what the difference is between an inspector and an appraiser. Tell them to contact the appraiser for those measurements. No ... it is not something an inspector should do or be expected to do.
  46. 1 point
    I have been with the InspectorPro program (Citadel Insurance Services, LC) for more than a few years, rate keeps going down as the years go by. I'm happy.
  47. 1 point
    Or is it the lack of sadness that counts?
  48. 1 point
    With the single exception of looking for minor current on water pipes, I can't imagine a situation where a home inspector would need to be able to measure milliamps. And even that exception is pushing it. If you're going to use it on the job it'll be for testing the operation of heating elements in water heaters, amp draw at compressors, operation of electric furnace/heat pump elements, and for more in-depth testing of receptacles than you can do with a three-light tester. That's all pretty crude work. You don't need anything more precise than a tenth of an amp and you don't need true RMS. Any of the baseline meters from the major manufacturers will be fine. I started using a lot of UEI equipment because they were headquartered here and I could stop in for free repairs that were done while I watched. After a while, I just got to really like them. Sperry & GB are fine. It's hard to go wrong with Fluke. Like point & shoot cameras, it doesn't really make a whole lot of difference.
  49. 1 point
    David, why are you selling your Ti32?
  50. 1 point
    So what I have gleaned from this is; If pool items are not bonded the possible results could be Death! If pool items are bonded it might cost the person some extra $$ to prevent Death! Kind of a no brainier. I don't think you will ever get in trouble for recommending all pool items need to be properly bonded.
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