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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/25/2017 in Posts

  1. T'was 6 days before Christmas, and all through the town, people wore masks, that covered their frown. The frown had begun way back in the spring when a global pandemic changed everything. They called it corona, but unlike the beer, It didn’t bring good times, it didn’t bring cheer. Airplanes were grounded, travel was banned. Borders were closed across air, sea, and land. As the world entered lockdown to flatten the curve, the economy halted, and folks lost their nerve. From March to July we rode the first wave, people stayed home, they tried to behave. When summer emerged the lockdown wa
    6 points
  2. I was a mechanic for a long time. Many of you have heard me say, "I'm still a better mechanic than I am anything else." Even though I fixed every single thing that came into my shop, I couldn't have fixed any of it without tools. Many inspectors simply do not have the proper tools in their box to enable them to produce quality reports. If you can't write, you can't write a great report.
    6 points
  3. Taking photos is like choosing words. Adding many more doesn't fix the few well chosen ones that you missed. You may have much experience in claims but you're at the tail end trying to fix something. We're at the beginning trying to create that something.
    5 points
  4. Is this your first time looking at milled lumber? Everything in your pictures is perfectly normal. These are characteristics of lumber, which is a natural product that comes from large plants called "trees." The characteristics in your pictures are all taken into account when lumber is graded. The ugly things in the 1st, 2nd, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, and 14th pictures are old injuries to the tree that have scabbed over, probably from wind damage where limbs broke off. Don't worry about them. The lumber grader looked at them and said that they were fine for that grade of lumber.
    4 points
  5. I heard of one inspector who saw the note on the front door not to let the cat out. When he was finishing up and went outside and then came back, the cat was on the front porch. He put the cat back in the house and left. Wasn't their cat; cat destroyed the drapes, furniture, etc.
    4 points
  6. a pleasant reminder of my good sense in divorcing my first wife.
    4 points
  7. Sorry, I don't speak bullshit. Could you explain *exactly* what it is that you plan to do?
    3 points
  8. A new one for me; 1950 era window latch. Allows for latching while sash is partially raised.
    3 points
  9. Actually, I suspect that none of this is worth your time. A 21 year old with no experience in the trades, no experience running a past business, and without a full-time mentor for several years cannot become a successful home inspector. It's just not going to happen. If your lack of technical knowledge doesn't get you sued into oblivion, your lack of business acumen will result in a failed business within a few years. My revised best advice: Cut your losses and forget about home inspections. At your age, you should find the thing in life that you enjoy doing more than anything else
    3 points
  10. Challenge accepted in 36 words: Serious concerns include non-viable floor framing, major heating and air conditioning problems, too many roof layers, no crawlspace access, and inadequate attic access. I can't perform a diligent review without access to these critical areas. Lesson learned: Prepositions can be a huge waste of words.
    3 points
  11. This scary face rose out of the garlic patch.
    3 points
  12. Trent's is WAY too big for me! I"m more of a small raised bed guy. Last year I donated over 1000 tomatoes and untold cucumbers to the homeless shelter from my little plot. Drip irrigation on a timer valve. Black plastic on the ground so I don't have to weed. Just plant, water and harvest. Did way to much weeding in my daddy's garden, which was even bigger than Trent's way back when I was a little one. God forbid he found weeds growing in your section of the garden.
    3 points
  13. I doubt you could pay enough to override my scepticism.
    3 points
  14. Yep, A growing problem with teenage squirrels - sewer gas huffing and huffing parties. A side effect is the urge to gnaw on the nearest object. The squirrel authorities are concerned and want to get the message out to all squirrel parents that sewer gases contain methane, hydrogen-sulfide and other toxic fumes and that huffing sewer gas can lead to death. The teens aren't listening. In fact, a week ago, three of them under the influence of sewer gas knocked over a walnut cache and overpowered and killed the elderly security squirrel guarding the nuts. ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!
    3 points
  15. Lack of brevity. Some people just go on and on. They keep talking about the same issue in multiple ways. They can't just state things simply and concisely. They feel the need to hammer the issue in from many angles. They just ramble forever about that which could be easily stated in one sentence. They just go on and on and on. . .
    3 points
  16. Of those inspectors who use this coverage as part of their marketing to real estate agents, I'll bet that most, if not all of them do not advertise the fact to their actual customers. In fact, I'll also bet that they intentionally keep quiet about it. Look at it this way: if you were a home buyer and you knew that the inspector that your agent recommended was paying to indemnify that agent, would that elevate the inspector in your eyes? Would it make you think twice about the agent's motivations and the inspector's loyalties? In my experience all but the most credulous home buyers would v
    3 points
  17. My 4 1/2 minutes of fame.
    3 points
  18. A 32' commercial grade extension ladder will probably get you to the roof of more than 90% of American homes. It is also considerably more durable and cheaper than a drone. They weigh about 65 pounds, making them about as heavy as a fourth-grader and much easier to handle. Also, on a residential home inspection, the use of ladders is not subject to federal oversight, another attribute weighing in their favor. So why mess around with drones?
    3 points
  19. I've always found it odd that we dig a round hole in the ground, call it a well, and expect it to produce water. Then we dig a square hole in the ground, call it a basement, and expect it to stay dry.
    3 points
  20. In California, toothpaste causes cancer. So does the box that it comes in. This concludes my rant.
    3 points
  21. I spend a lot of time in the Southeast, so I can translate. At an inspection last week, Jim discovered an outpouring of many problems, right from the start. Jim advised his client that he could abort the inspection and would only have to pay for Jim's time to that point. 10 minutes later, the client asked Jim to discontinue, payed a reduced fee and Jim later issued a letter the client could use to terminate the purchase agreement.
    3 points
  22. Hope y'all adjust to the time loss, and have a great Spring!
    3 points
  23. Years ago, Helped Mike and Rose improve their report format. Then took one of my reports, where I liked the format, and I just saved it in MS Word. Then I overwrote it again, and again, and again, changing the descriptions where necessary, names and dates and places, and word-searching and then grabbing an old comment about whatever issue from an old report and editing it as needed to make it fit the current report. I guess I've been doing that for the past 12 or 13 years. I write all full narrative. Some of you will note that I've never posted reports here. Reason is simple, I know
    3 points
  24. The siding radiates only the heat that has already escaped the conditioned space of the structure.
    3 points
  25. Taping the joints was never recommended or required. In fact, with listed B-vents it's prohibited - always has been. If we're talking about a Category I furnace (hot exhaust) there should be negative pressure in the vent anyway - never positive pressure. That's part of the definition of a Category I furnace. The furnace motor does not "push" the exhaust through. The exhaust rises by buoyancy, creating negative pressure behind it. The draft inducer (the thing you're calling the furnace motor) only serves to draw a regulated amount of air across the burners - it does not "push" air through
    2 points
  26. It rings like bullshit.
    2 points
  27. There are dozens of issues with this house that could easily be resolved with a D9 Dozer. Brief enough?
    2 points
  28. For large openings. For small openings, stainless steel wool works great. The mice will not chew on it because it makes their fillings hurt.
    2 points
  29. The masonry chimney flue has become a chase for added vents, so they're not technically sharing a flue. The big problem is that's probably an uninsulated single-wall metal flue liner, so there's clearance issues to the PVC vent pipes. Also, the metal liner is not secured with a proper collar and the cap isn't attached with a proper fitting.
    2 points
  30. The Hotel Henry just moved us to their largest ballroom. We outgrew the room we reserved. The Grand Ballroom is huge with 40 ft high ceilings and massive windows overlooking the grounds. We now have as much room as we need! If you were on the fence, consider included breakfasts, lunches and a Saturday night cash bar where we buy all the drinks for the first hour! Great food, smart people and Jim Katen and Bill Kibbel each presenting. This is your chance to get the best CEU's available anywhere.
    2 points
  31. Secure a hepa filter over the register nearest to your furnace. After a week or two, take the filter to your lab and have them test that.
    2 points
  32. Don't put a footing drain where there's no footing. "Waterproofing" contractors have caused major failures to many stone and brick foundations. I get called in as the expert witness. The clay pipe is for the original gravity drain. It no longer functions as originally intended, but illustrates that the builder expected water in the basement and gave it a path out. https://historicbldgs.com/stonefoundations.html
    2 points
  33. I write the report and give it to the client. I'll help a little, but I'm not their champion. I do my best to reference code, manufacturer's instructions major organizations and ASTM standards. Usually, the only time I see the builder is in court. I can't think of anything good coming from the situation you described.
    2 points
  34. I like it, but have a hard time hanging it straight. 😃
    2 points
  35. There certainly is an intellectual side to this profession and it was not recognized for decades. At one point there were just a handful of individuals that were home inspectors and they got inundated with people joining the profession that had changed a light bulb or built a deck. It was not that long ago and many remain in the business. As I understand and recall your path, you choose complete immersion and are blessed with great ambition. You also brought an intellect and mindset that was not common at that time. Now you are an educator and mentor - but it has been a journey!
    2 points
  36. I've never heard one. Come to think of it, I haven't heard much of anything in the last 50 years.
    2 points
  37. That approach is designed to avoid the situation that would bring the insurance company into the picture in the first place. It's unreasonable to expect an insurance company to adopt such an approach as policy. Having said that, the number of substantial client complaints I've had in over 16 years can be counted on the fingers of one hand. I credit that on satisfying whatever client needs I can reasonably offer, even if it means exceeding the SOP. The SOP, without an educational standard and a mandated writing style to go with it, is a ridiculous standard upon which to base a quali
    2 points
  38. Some folks never need to "manage" anyone's expectations. They're the ones that consistently and assiduously exceed all expectations. There seems to be some of those types of folks here at the Inspector's Journal. It's evident in replies to this topic and many others.
    2 points
  39. Will you still be glad that you shopped around when you someday have a claim that they refuse to cover?
    2 points
  40. We have the dates set- March 21-23 at Hotel Henry. Les, this going to be 24 hours of real education- zero fluff. Proving the commitment to quality, Bill Kibbel is on board. Speakers to be announced as they confirm.
    2 points
  41. "If it leaks slower than it evaporates from the rag, then it's an evaporative cooler." From the book, "Things Realtors Say".
    2 points
  42. Ladder climbing does involve risk. So does showering, walking indoors, walking outdoors -especially in winter, removing electrical panel covers, standing near a water heater whose TPRV lacks a decent discharge pipe, operating furnaces, eating romaine lettuce, driving to and from inspections, and opening emails. In every case, a bit of knowledge and training greatly mitigates that risk. Come on.
    2 points
  43. I didn't know that McDonald was still manufacturing cats.
    2 points
  44. TIJ has lost lots of expertise this past year and I've joined the Inspector Brotherhood, found some other TIJ members there too, but TIJ will forever be my favorite. It still has more expertise, has more answers, than any other site I've ever been to. When the questions get tough, head for TIJ.
    2 points
  45. The installer wears Crocs. The holes let all dignity drain out.
    2 points
  46. I see that with one coat stucco all the time. There's a reason why traditional stucco was applied in three coats. . .
    2 points
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