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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/17/2020 in Posts

  1. T'was 6 days before Christmas, and all through the town, people wore masks, that covered their frown. The frown had begun way back in the spring when a global pandemic changed everything. They called it corona, but unlike the beer, It didn’t bring good times, it didn’t bring cheer. Airplanes were grounded, travel was banned. Borders were closed across air, sea, and land. As the world entered lockdown to flatten the curve, the economy halted, and folks lost their nerve. From March to July we rode the first wave, people stayed home, they tried to behave. When summer emerged the lockdown wa
    6 points
  2. Sorry, I don't speak bullshit. Could you explain *exactly* what it is that you plan to do?
    3 points
  3. A new one for me; 1950 era window latch. Allows for latching while sash is partially raised.
    3 points
  4. Actually, I suspect that none of this is worth your time. A 21 year old with no experience in the trades, no experience running a past business, and without a full-time mentor for several years cannot become a successful home inspector. It's just not going to happen. If your lack of technical knowledge doesn't get you sued into oblivion, your lack of business acumen will result in a failed business within a few years. My revised best advice: Cut your losses and forget about home inspections. At your age, you should find the thing in life that you enjoy doing more than anything else
    3 points
  5. Challenge accepted in 36 words: Serious concerns include non-viable floor framing, major heating and air conditioning problems, too many roof layers, no crawlspace access, and inadequate attic access. I can't perform a diligent review without access to these critical areas. Lesson learned: Prepositions can be a huge waste of words.
    3 points
  6. Possibly the worst home inspection website I've ever seen. Nothing about it makes me want to hire you.
    2 points
  7. Taping the joints was never recommended or required. In fact, with listed B-vents it's prohibited - always has been. If we're talking about a Category I furnace (hot exhaust) there should be negative pressure in the vent anyway - never positive pressure. That's part of the definition of a Category I furnace. The furnace motor does not "push" the exhaust through. The exhaust rises by buoyancy, creating negative pressure behind it. The draft inducer (the thing you're calling the furnace motor) only serves to draw a regulated amount of air across the burners - it does not "push" air through
    2 points
  8. I think the porch is fine the way it is. Invest in some good landscaping for crying out loud. It'll do way more for the house than a bunch of pointless concrete.
    2 points
  9. It rings like bullshit.
    2 points
  10. You've got to be a millennial. Asbestos fibers are not good to breathe. But at the level that you're talking about there is essentially no risk. Just live your life until you get the test results back. If there's asbestos in the sample, just use a regular old paint brush to put regular old paint over the scraped area. Your phone is a far greater threat to your health than the ceiling is.
    2 points
  11. At first I thought Jim, you're waxing poetic, Then saw it's a copy, but not 'til I'd read it, Beginning to end, Did he do that on purpose? No matter, it did bring some cheer to this carcass, Here's wishing y'all a Merry Olde Christmas! 😃
    2 points
  12. We were wondering whither the weather and whether it will be waxing, waning wintry, windy, wet, or what and where and when?
    2 points
  13. Each message that you write is a "post." That's how the internet works. So you're saying that the first pictures that you posted on this thread are what you came back to after returning from vacation and that before the vacation, your house was spotless. How long was your vacation? 10 years?
    2 points
  14. Let me translate. "I'm a link dropper from Kakinada, India and I copy & past useless stuff on forums so saps will pay me for website SEO".
    2 points
  15. There are dozens of issues with this house that could easily be resolved with a D9 Dozer. Brief enough?
    2 points
  16. I guess it wouldn't be kosher to use direct language we use among ourselves. This place is a pile of shit with blocked access. I can't and won't inspect it. Don't buy it.
    2 points
  17. For large openings. For small openings, stainless steel wool works great. The mice will not chew on it because it makes their fillings hurt.
    2 points
  18. I don't rent my receivables. Cash or check. No one complains. There are enough "costs of doing business" without having to pay to accept payment.
    2 points
  19. Maybe they should just charge exorbitant interest rates. Oh, wait. . .
    2 points
  20. I will see you berries and raise you a tomato sandwich.
    2 points
  21. The masonry chimney flue has become a chase for added vents, so they're not technically sharing a flue. The big problem is that's probably an uninsulated single-wall metal flue liner, so there's clearance issues to the PVC vent pipes. Also, the metal liner is not secured with a proper collar and the cap isn't attached with a proper fitting.
    2 points
  22. not that i'm aware of & recently verified by the ahj the day after my inspection on a new build here source: https://www.ecmweb.com/national-electrical-code/qa/article/20888229/code-qa The rules for securing and supporting Type MC cable can be found in Section 330.30 of the Code. The requirements can be summarized as follows: Type MC cable must be supported and secured by staples, cable ties, straps, hangers, or similar fittings, designed and installed so as not to damage the cable. Type MC cable, with four or less conductors sized no larger than 10 AWG, must be secur
    2 points
  23. Reminds me of when I was a kid. We went to visit my cousins in Pittsburgh and all went out for vanilla ice cream cones. My cousins showed me how if you just hold up your cone in the air for a while without licking it, a grey film formed on the ice cream and dripped down it in streaks - just like the streaks in those pictures. According to them it was coal dust, which was thick in the Pittsburgh air in the '60s. They insisted that it made the ice cream taste better. Did this roof taste better?
    2 points
  24. Hi Don, The above is very honest feedback. People visit sites to see and meet the inspector they might be hiring. Who is your "team"? What are each of their qualifications and experience? It doesn't even mention what area. It doesn't show a location to indicate it's a legit business. No need to tell people why a home inspection is needed. They already know and are searching for a competent candidate. There's nothing in there that would ever result in your site showing up in a search - ever. Also, your meta tags are useless for search indexing. Typo and punc
    1 point
  25. That's spider debris. The small separation at the top of the window shouldn't be related to insects. Is the window flashed on the outside?
    1 point
  26. A newbie from New York City!
    1 point
  27. thought the top might be a smoked colored lens like skylights i've seen let us know if/when you find out
    1 point
  28. It sure has been an unusual year for me. We worked with a completely different protocol, spent less time in the office, way more time in the field, and ended up with a slight gain in sales and revenue for 2020. I have been at this for several decades and chose 2020 as my last year to actively do inspections. The company remains with all the same people along with one more part-time inspector It will continue to grow and innovate. This year taught me that adversity comes in many forms; economy, virus, age, etc. Adversity does not always translate into less sales or money/profit
    1 point
  29. Don't worry about it, Tantor. If this is the *big problem* in your life right now, you're doing better than most people on the planet. Be thankful that you have the privilege of obsessing over individual asbestos fibers.
    1 point
  30. In our area there was a time (now we're talking early 60's) when a university here was granted approval to reduce floor/ceiling concrete slab thickness by some measure (not sure exactly the difference) by spraying ceilings with popcorn containing asbestos. The reason had to do with fire rating. It only made sense past a certain threshold of scale. These were 6 to 10 storey high rise dormitories using large amounts of concrete. About 15 yrs after occupancy a student noticed a thin dusty film on the top of a drink in a cup. Analysis found the film was asbestos fiber that had drifted
    1 point
  31. Popcorn ceiling texture has a much deeper pile and is, generally, quite delicate. You can scrape it off with your thumb. Some popcorn ceiling texture had asbestos in it and some didn't. The stuff in your picture is a textured finish, just not one that I'd characterize as popcorn. It might have asbestos in it and it might not. The drywall behind it might or might not contain asbestos and the drywall finishing compound used to finish it might or might not contain asbestos. Asbestos was used in over 3,000 building products and in countless other consumer products. Stand on a busy street corner to
    1 point
  32. Asbestos was certainly used in some flooring mastics, but my recollection is that all those mastics were black. The yellow stuff is more modern. If you want to be sure, just scrape a bit into a baggy and have it tested. The testing is cheap and it'll give you peace of mind.
    1 point
  33. It looks like there were water problems at the corner. The radiators were leaking? Make sure there are no ongoing moisture issues with the pavement. Cover the area with plastic taped at the edges and see if you get any condensation underneath. I'm not a big fan of mold testing.
    1 point
  34. That's how it would look even if the parquet had been free of active mold growth, but since there's a history of mold issues, I'd get a mold remediation contractor out there to confirm that the mold issue is gone before you put down new floor finish. Just to be sure.
    1 point
  35. That's exactly what it looks like. But I've walked on a lot of hot roofs and never had tabs do that when I was walking on them. Maybe the crew was getting down to Chubby Checker or something.
    1 point
  36. Sure. Just install one of those under-sink recirculating pumps. It pumps water from the hot pipe into the cold pipe until its thermostat tells it that the water is hot. You can even connect them to a motion sensor so that they only work when they sense motion in the bathroom.
    1 point
  37. They do. The holes are for inserting the tools that agitate the dirt.
    1 point
  38. 1 point
  39. "Time was, When we got along..."--Canned Heat
    1 point
  40. Katen's got a forearm like Popeye.
    1 point
  41. I'm am at the point where I'd rather wash dishes or change oil than visit a FB page for home inspectors.
    1 point
  42. "...Mold needs moisture to propagate..." Moldmania needs propaganda to proliferate.
    1 point
  43. There's no reason to install any kind of upgrade to an old Wesco electric furnace. Everything in them can be replaced with off the shelf parts. They're already 100% efficient in terms of how much heat they produced per unit of fuel. They can't be made more efficient with new parts. As John pointed out, a new thermostat will improve the efficiency of the heating *system.*
    1 point
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