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  1. Mia, Are you trying to drive yourself insane? If you find out that the sample you've taken contains asbestos what will you do - move out of your home never to return? I've got news for you. There is no place on the planet you can go to eliminate the risk of asbestos exposure. However, if you're so afraid that you're going to inhale asbestos fibers, go out and purchase a full face respirator with P100 filtration, wear it 24/7/365 and only take it off to eat. That won't get the asbestos out of your lungs that you've already inhaled, but it will prevent more from getting in there - except fo
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  2. Don't worry about it, Tantor. If this is the *big problem* in your life right now, you're doing better than most people on the planet. Be thankful that you have the privilege of obsessing over individual asbestos fibers.
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  3. You've got to be a millennial. Asbestos fibers are not good to breathe. But at the level that you're talking about there is essentially no risk. Just live your life until you get the test results back. If there's asbestos in the sample, just use a regular old paint brush to put regular old paint over the scraped area. Your phone is a far greater threat to your health than the ceiling is.
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  4. If you're still concerned after reading the above, it is possible to have a sample of the texture tested for asbestos content. In my area, analysis can be done for around $50 and results only take a few days. Perhaps it'll give you the peace of mind you need.
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  5. In our area there was a time (now we're talking early 60's) when a university here was granted approval to reduce floor/ceiling concrete slab thickness by some measure (not sure exactly the difference) by spraying ceilings with popcorn containing asbestos. The reason had to do with fire rating. It only made sense past a certain threshold of scale. These were 6 to 10 storey high rise dormitories using large amounts of concrete. About 15 yrs after occupancy a student noticed a thin dusty film on the top of a drink in a cup. Analysis found the film was asbestos fiber that had drifted
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  6. Popcorn ceiling texture has a much deeper pile and is, generally, quite delicate. You can scrape it off with your thumb. Some popcorn ceiling texture had asbestos in it and some didn't. The stuff in your picture is a textured finish, just not one that I'd characterize as popcorn. It might have asbestos in it and it might not. The drywall behind it might or might not contain asbestos and the drywall finishing compound used to finish it might or might not contain asbestos. Asbestos was used in over 3,000 building products and in countless other consumer products. Stand on a busy street corner to
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  7. That's not a popcorn ceiling. If there's any asbestos in the ceiling texture, it's behind several layers of paint. Have a coke and a smile and stop worrying about it.
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  8. Asbestos was certainly used in some flooring mastics, but my recollection is that all those mastics were black. The yellow stuff is more modern. If you want to be sure, just scrape a bit into a baggy and have it tested. The testing is cheap and it'll give you peace of mind.
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  9. Hi Mia, Mold creates black stains that are not mold, but still black. So the black areas might not be mold. Any mold testing company can easily test those areas and tell you precisely what molds are or are not there. But why bother? If there's mold there and the area stays dry, the mold will not grow and will never cause anyone any problems. If you clean up every molecule of mold and then let the area get wet, new mold will grow again. That's why Mike Lamb was telling you to check for moisture. That's *way* more important than obsessing about whether or not the black
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  10. It looks like there were water problems at the corner. The radiators were leaking? Make sure there are no ongoing moisture issues with the pavement. Cover the area with plastic taped at the edges and see if you get any condensation underneath. I'm not a big fan of mold testing.
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  11. That's how it would look even if the parquet had been free of active mold growth, but since there's a history of mold issues, I'd get a mold remediation contractor out there to confirm that the mold issue is gone before you put down new floor finish. Just to be sure.
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  12. That's exactly what it looks like. But I've walked on a lot of hot roofs and never had tabs do that when I was walking on them. Maybe the crew was getting down to Chubby Checker or something.
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  13. Sure. Just install one of those under-sink recirculating pumps. It pumps water from the hot pipe into the cold pipe until its thermostat tells it that the water is hot. You can even connect them to a motion sensor so that they only work when they sense motion in the bathroom.
    1 point
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