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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/20/2020 in all areas

  1. T'was 6 days before Christmas, and all through the town, people wore masks, that covered their frown. The frown had begun way back in the spring when a global pandemic changed everything. They called it corona, but unlike the beer, It didn’t bring good times, it didn’t bring cheer. Airplanes were grounded, travel was banned. Borders were closed across air, sea, and land. As the world entered lockdown to flatten the curve, the economy halted, and folks lost their nerve. From March to July we rode the first wave, people stayed home, they tried to behave. When summer emerged the lockdown wa
    6 points
  2. Sorry, I don't speak bullshit. Could you explain *exactly* what it is that you plan to do?
    3 points
  3. A new one for me; 1950 era window latch. Allows for latching while sash is partially raised.
    3 points
  4. Actually, I suspect that none of this is worth your time. A 21 year old with no experience in the trades, no experience running a past business, and without a full-time mentor for several years cannot become a successful home inspector. It's just not going to happen. If your lack of technical knowledge doesn't get you sued into oblivion, your lack of business acumen will result in a failed business within a few years. My revised best advice: Cut your losses and forget about home inspections. At your age, you should find the thing in life that you enjoy doing more than anything else
    3 points
  5. Challenge accepted in 36 words: Serious concerns include non-viable floor framing, major heating and air conditioning problems, too many roof layers, no crawlspace access, and inadequate attic access. I can't perform a diligent review without access to these critical areas. Lesson learned: Prepositions can be a huge waste of words.
    3 points
  6. Possibly the worst home inspection website I've ever seen. Nothing about it makes me want to hire you.
    2 points
  7. Taping the joints was never recommended or required. In fact, with listed B-vents it's prohibited - always has been. If we're talking about a Category I furnace (hot exhaust) there should be negative pressure in the vent anyway - never positive pressure. That's part of the definition of a Category I furnace. The furnace motor does not "push" the exhaust through. The exhaust rises by buoyancy, creating negative pressure behind it. The draft inducer (the thing you're calling the furnace motor) only serves to draw a regulated amount of air across the burners - it does not "push" air through
    2 points
  8. I think the porch is fine the way it is. Invest in some good landscaping for crying out loud. It'll do way more for the house than a bunch of pointless concrete.
    2 points
  9. It rings like bullshit.
    2 points
  10. You've got to be a millennial. Asbestos fibers are not good to breathe. But at the level that you're talking about there is essentially no risk. Just live your life until you get the test results back. If there's asbestos in the sample, just use a regular old paint brush to put regular old paint over the scraped area. Your phone is a far greater threat to your health than the ceiling is.
    2 points
  11. At first I thought Jim, you're waxing poetic, Then saw it's a copy, but not 'til I'd read it, Beginning to end, Did he do that on purpose? No matter, it did bring some cheer to this carcass, Here's wishing y'all a Merry Olde Christmas! 😃
    2 points
  12. We were wondering whither the weather and whether it will be waxing, waning wintry, windy, wet, or what and where and when?
    2 points
  13. Each message that you write is a "post." That's how the internet works. So you're saying that the first pictures that you posted on this thread are what you came back to after returning from vacation and that before the vacation, your house was spotless. How long was your vacation? 10 years?
    2 points
  14. Let me translate. "I'm a link dropper from Kakinada, India and I copy & past useless stuff on forums so saps will pay me for website SEO".
    2 points
  15. There are dozens of issues with this house that could easily be resolved with a D9 Dozer. Brief enough?
    2 points
  16. I guess it wouldn't be kosher to use direct language we use among ourselves. This place is a pile of shit with blocked access. I can't and won't inspect it. Don't buy it.
    2 points
  17. For large openings. For small openings, stainless steel wool works great. The mice will not chew on it because it makes their fillings hurt.
    2 points
  18. I don't rent my receivables. Cash or check. No one complains. There are enough "costs of doing business" without having to pay to accept payment.
    2 points
  19. Maybe they should just charge exorbitant interest rates. Oh, wait. . .
    2 points
  20. I will see you berries and raise you a tomato sandwich.
    2 points
  21. The masonry chimney flue has become a chase for added vents, so they're not technically sharing a flue. The big problem is that's probably an uninsulated single-wall metal flue liner, so there's clearance issues to the PVC vent pipes. Also, the metal liner is not secured with a proper collar and the cap isn't attached with a proper fitting.
    2 points
  22. not that i'm aware of & recently verified by the ahj the day after my inspection on a new build here source: https://www.ecmweb.com/national-electrical-code/qa/article/20888229/code-qa The rules for securing and supporting Type MC cable can be found in Section 330.30 of the Code. The requirements can be summarized as follows: Type MC cable must be supported and secured by staples, cable ties, straps, hangers, or similar fittings, designed and installed so as not to damage the cable. Type MC cable, with four or less conductors sized no larger than 10 AWG, must be secur
    2 points
  23. Reminds me of when I was a kid. We went to visit my cousins in Pittsburgh and all went out for vanilla ice cream cones. My cousins showed me how if you just hold up your cone in the air for a while without licking it, a grey film formed on the ice cream and dripped down it in streaks - just like the streaks in those pictures. According to them it was coal dust, which was thick in the Pittsburgh air in the '60s. They insisted that it made the ice cream taste better. Did this roof taste better?
    2 points
  24. That's structural terra cotta. historicbldgs.com/terra_cotta.html If it is vitrified (and not just shiny from being wet) and the long edges are rounded, it could be telephone tile. historicbldgs.com/telephone_tile.html If it's not vitrified, then the shell is quite brittle. Ask your contractor to show you how well he drills the sides of flower pots. I've seen plenty of attempts at drilling - for termite treatments and installing anchors - that have blown out very large sections. I don't much care for adding interior drain systems. I never thought letting even more water into a
    1 point
  25. According to that article, people should run from nearly every house I've inspected.
    1 point
  26. Jim, I think this might represent a springboard booster that could lift the whole team to a level never dreamed about before our team leader woke up that morning with such a great idea. PM me for a link to permission to access ever increasing horizons of opportunity!
    1 point
  27. I write stab-locks and FPE panels with red on the breakers. I'm not so quick to write off everything else that's FPE, even though they're old.
    1 point
  28. Mia, Are you trying to drive yourself insane? If you find out that the sample you've taken contains asbestos what will you do - move out of your home never to return? I've got news for you. There is no place on the planet you can go to eliminate the risk of asbestos exposure. However, if you're so afraid that you're going to inhale asbestos fibers, go out and purchase a full face respirator with P100 filtration, wear it 24/7/365 and only take it off to eat. That won't get the asbestos out of your lungs that you've already inhaled, but it will prevent more from getting in there - except fo
    1 point
  29. If you're still concerned after reading the above, it is possible to have a sample of the texture tested for asbestos content. In my area, analysis can be done for around $50 and results only take a few days. Perhaps it'll give you the peace of mind you need.
    1 point
  30. Hi Mia, Mold creates black stains that are not mold, but still black. So the black areas might not be mold. Any mold testing company can easily test those areas and tell you precisely what molds are or are not there. But why bother? If there's mold there and the area stays dry, the mold will not grow and will never cause anyone any problems. If you clean up every molecule of mold and then let the area get wet, new mold will grow again. That's why Mike Lamb was telling you to check for moisture. That's *way* more important than obsessing about whether or not the black
    1 point
  31. If this is a service entrance conductor that's carrying the entire load of the service and if there are no derating issues at play, then you only need to size the wire at 83% of the load. In effect, a 100-amp service only needs to have 83-amp service entrance wires. That makes #2 AL THW a perfectly valid choice.
    1 point
  32. “A house can have integrity, just like a person,' said Roark, 'and just as seldom.”
    1 point
  33. I can't think of a better launchpad for a career in home inspection. But since your experience is limited to commercial, I offer a few words of what you might encounter as an HI. This is a profession where you will frequently encounter agents. Agents have a professional duty to serve their buyers, but by law, they receive compensation only via a commission, and only if the house is sold. Inspections, by their very nature, don't help the agent sell the house and secure his commission. It's the opposite. The better an inspector can serve a buyer, the more of a threat that inspector is to t
    1 point
  34. I was told this building had the first open cage elevator in Chicago. 1893. It is still hand operated.
    1 point
  35. Sometimes, it's wise to know when to cut your losses and move on. Sounds like you're there.
    1 point
  36. Here's a little video of it at work. https://d2y5sgsy8bbmb8.cloudfront.net/v2/1bd2e631-c6b1-5cc0-8b54-28e9e1047868/ShortForm-Generic-480p-16-9-1409173089793-rpcbe5.mp4
    1 point
  37. Jim's reply clearly explains the truth about mold testing - without all of the foul language I would have used. If a buyer's inspector started mold testing a home I was selling, he would probably need a medical professional to retrieve the test equipment from an orifice.
    1 point
  38. A ferrous forest in the golden gloaming.
    1 point
  39. Unless there has been a storm recently that blew rainwater up into the ridge vent, I'd be suspicious of the moisture level in that room. Humid air is lighter than dry air and will rise as high as it can get. Add to that the fact that this is the peak of the summer season when the humidity load on the AC system is at it's highest. I'm in Lafayette so I'm familiar with your climate. A house built in 2000 is generally better sealed but an AC not functioning optimally in this hot/humid climate might cool the air just fine but may not remove as much humidity. You'll feel cool and think
    1 point
  40. Unless the slit, is not legit And was commit, ed by a twit Who used a bit, to bore the slit As an aftermarkit, retrofit. - Jim-Manuel Miranda
    1 point
  41. comm gig this week they obviously missed the memo
    1 point
  42. My tree guy used one of those last year. His reached 60 feet.
    1 point
  43. A typical TPRV drain here is the white plastic type, plain old PVC. On a tank heater, the drain squirts into a pan under the tank. Then the pan should have a drain pipe to the exterior or to a perimeter drain. 3/4" PEX would be undersized in comparison to the ready-made thin-wall PVC, I think. Y'all know this but when lurkers come here to learn, they learn good.😄
    1 point
  44. I think your just plain wrong here. There are, of course, times when those conflicts are present, but they're rare. In the vast majority of instances, the thing that best protects the inspector is for him or her to do that thing that best serves the customer. In other words, cover the client's butt and yours will be covered automatically. By the way, the people who framed the original standard of practice for this profession clearly intended for that standard to be a *minimum*, not a maximum. An inspection report that doesn't exceed the standard of practice is a piss-poor report.
    1 point
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