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Snakes in attic


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Today doing a pre-listing inspection I found this evidence of a snake invasion/infestation. Snake skins and numerous small burrows in the insulation, no snakes visible.

The attic is not properly ventilated. Would proper ventilation stop this being good snake habitat? Do you introduce a predator? ( I don't know why she swallowed the fly) Remove and replace with another kind of insulation?

This home constructed of concrete walls six feet tall on the back side and ends with the eaves about thirty inches from the ground.

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I don't know about Colorado, but in Kentucky, if there are snakes in the hood, there are snakes in the hood. I saw something similar recently and was told that the five-foot-long skins were shed by "harmless" cow snakes. These buggers were in the insulated, but unclad, garage walls, as well. I'm pretty much a badass, but it creeped the shit out of me.

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This close to the bayous and swamps, there are lots of snakes around and I often see the skins in the attic. They're too pervasive to write them up unless they are alive. It's usually too hot in the attics here for them to remain for long.

This one is from last March.

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Marc

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In Colorado, I imagine that the snakes are seeking the warmth of the attic.

Predator? What are you going to do, put a mongoose up there?

The only way to keep them out is to block off the access points. Snake can fit through very small openings.

I regularly run into these guys, though mostly outside:

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In fact, I keep a pillowcase in the car. Sellers are usually happy to let me stuff the snake into the pillowcase and bring 'em home to let go under the porch.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Around here we have what is called a rat snake.

I have seen two live ones in attic and lot of skins.

Most of the homes where at less 75 year of age.

One house I inspected had six skins with in 3 foot of the attic access. This house also had a live rattlesnake in the crawlspace.

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Snakes are the predators, close off access to mice and rats along with the snakes is about the only thing you can do. Or you could just have the client do some deep breathing and chant "Snakes are a good thing, Snakes are a good thing"

Does not work for me but hey, it's worth a shot.[^]

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Of Georgia's 40 different species of snakes, only six are venomous. All non-venomous snakes are protected by state law and may not be captured or killed. King snakes, in paticular, are immune to venomous snake bites and will help control said population. Over the years I have foot flipped more than a few king snakes into the woods that were stretched across the road sunnin' themselves. I'm sure with the universal revulsion about snakes that our law is honored more in the breach than regularly. How about other states?

//bb

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Hi,

Snakes don't bother me; poisonous or non-poisonous - I've handled both many times, scorpians, spiders, lions and tigers and bears (OH MY!!!). Dead bodies don't bother me, peoples guts splattered all over the place doesn't bother me, guys with guns out there shooting back, that doesn't bother me. Just about whatever it is, it doesn't spook me - unless it's a rat. Then I turn into a little girl, let out a hi-pitched squeal that would make Mariah Carie envious and I run away like my hair is on fire.

Go figure.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi,

I think the proper ventilation will do to the Snake factor. There are many different types of household roof and attic ventilation systems, including ridge vents, turbine vents, gable vents, static vents and cupola vents. Each variety of ventilation system circulates air in your attic or crawlspace differently. Some systems are more effective than others, depending on the design of your roof, the climate you live in, and the size of your attic. The snake may have been due to moisture factor. The circulation through ventilation prevents hot air build up and allows moisture to escape, thereby minimizing the risk of expensive damage to your home's upper structure.

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Back when I was a kid, and was a gas jockey, my boss, who owned a Texaco station, had a 6' (or so) Boa Constrictor that he kept in a glass aquarium in the front of the shop. I use to put him around my neck and walk outside to pump gas. The customers use to dig it. That was 1971 or 1972. Their not much to write home about, they sleep, eat and crap.

It's a little weird though to watch them unhinge their jaw and swallow a rodent whole. You can watch the "food" progress down the pipe.

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LOL,

Back in 1989 when I was attending the Q course at Ft. Bragg, B Company 1st SPAR (Abn) had a copperhead that was kept in a glass case in the orderly room. It was so accustomed to human interaction that, as long as you moved slowly and deliberately and didn't startle him, you could reach right in and pick him up and he'd wrap himself around your hand for the warmth. Doing that was kind of a right of passage for anyone that got stuck with OD or CQ. I have to admit that the pucker factor was right up there with my first jump the first time I pulled the duty and had to pick that guy up.

He got a little white mouse for a meal about once a week. It was something to watch. Drop the mouse in the case and he would slowly and carefully sidle into position for a strike and then hit that rodent just once. The mouse would jump around like he'd been stuck in the ass with a white-hot poker and then he'd flop over on his side and start panting as his legs were paralyzed. The snake would come around to the head end, unhinge his jaw and over the next five minutes, even though the mouse was still alive and breathing, gradually take the mouse completely in. Once he got the mouse past the mouth area the mouse couldn't get any air and it would take less than a minute for the breathing to stop.

Since reptiles live an incredibly long time, I wouldn't be surprised to learn that he's still there to this day and still being used as a right of passage for members of that unit.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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It's a little weird though to watch them unhinge their jaw and swallow a rodent whole. You can watch the "food" progress down the pipe.

Curious....what did you feed him?

Marc

Gerbils and store bought mice.

Mikes recollection is dead on - pardon the expression. I had forgotten that detail but they always seem to start at the head end first. Curious.

I have always considered snakes just trying to make a living like the rest of us. They don't want confrontation anymore than you do and will do their best to back away from a tenuous situation. However if push comes to shove they will react like any of us.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Jerry Llewellyn was my first permanent party Platoon Sergeant when I first landed at the 118th MP Co.(Abn) back in 1976. I've been keeping in touch with him for the past few years via the internet.

He just sent me the following photos and commentary:

Guess what was found just south of Canton. Near a new KB homes subdivision.

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15 foot Eastern Diamondback rattlesnake. Largest ever caught on record.

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After seeing this, I did a little research, and learned the following:

One bite from a snake this large contains enough venom to kill over 40 full grown men.

The head alone is larger than the hand of a normal sized man.

This snake was probably alive when George H. W. Bush was President.

A bite from those fangs would equal being penetrated by two 1/4 inch screwdrivers.

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A snake this size could easily swallow a 2 year-old child.

A snake this size has an approximately 5 and 1/2 foot accurate striking distance. (The distance for an average size Rattlesnake is about 2 feet)

Judging by the size of the snake, it is estimated to weigh over 170 pounds. How much do you weigh?

------------------------

Love that guy. He can probably eat at least 60 rats before he even begins to notice that he's getting indigestion.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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