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Extended Roofing Warranty


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I'm in the market for a new roof and I wondered what your thoughts might be on purchasing an extended roofing warranty.

I'm thinking of using Certainteed Landmark and/or Premium Landmark shingles though my question is more general in nature.

Usually I don't purchase warranties, much less extended warranties unless there's a very good reason.

I live in the Western NY.

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I'm not sure what is meant by 'purchasing a warranty' on a new roof finish. I though that those warranties came with the purchase of the shingles.

I do know this: I have very seldom seen a shingle roof that was properly installed and that alone will get a warranty thrown out faster than you can blink your eye.

If you want to invest in a good roof, I'd suggest that you hire an inspector that you trust to monitor the installation.

Marc

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I'm not sure what is meant by 'purchasing a warranty' on a new roof finish. I though that those warranties came with the purchase of the shingles.

I do know this: I have very seldom seen a shingle roof that was properly installed and that alone will get a warranty thrown out faster than you can blink your eye.

If you want to invest in a good roof, I'd suggest that you hire an inspector that you trust to monitor the installation.

Marc

Yup.

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The extended warranty is a sales tool.

Certainteed shingles can be installed with extended warranties if the roofer meets certain installation requirements. For instance, a drip edge flashing is recommended but not required by Certainteed for an architectural-grade shingle installed with a 25 or 30 year warranty but if you install the same cover with a 40-year warranty the roofer must install drip edge flashings and must do everything that Certainteed requires as well as everything that they recommend for the warranty to be in force.

Around here it's very rare to see drip edge flashings installed; and, since they aren't required by code, builders can't be compelled to install them, unless one can determine the make and series of shingles, the length of the warranty and can determine through the manufacturer's specifications that drip edge flashings are required for the installation in question. Even if you've done all that, most builders around here laugh say there is no way they're going to install them.

An extended warranty will do you absolutely no good if you don't know how to properly maintain your roof. Why not just tell the roofer that you want the 25 year product installed in accordance with all of Certainteed's best practice recommendations and then take really good care of it?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Thank you all for your thoughts and suggestions.

Three follow-up questions:

1) hausdok and all, what exactly do you mean "take good care of the roof"?

2) how does one know they have a good inspector and/or one they can trust? Forgive me, I don't mean to be rude. Can one obtain references? Are there other references? How is an inspector going to help me?

3) Tom, I haven't been able to locate "Neff and Sons" via the internet, can you share more info? I tried the BBB also and they aren't listed there either. Also, why do you consider them the best?

4) My home was built in 1955 or so. I've been told that a quality roofing company should be asked the question, "How do you handle asbestos?" I then need to listen carefully . . . roofers simply can't "guess" about asbestos I'm told, tests are needed . . . licensed professionals if asbestos is there. I have no idea if there is any asbestos on my roof -- the shingles anyway are at least 20 years old (my best guess) Any thoughts on this aspect of the job?

E

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Thank you all for your thoughts and suggestions.

Three follow-up questions:

2) how does one know they have a good inspector and/or one they can trust? Forgive me, I don't mean to be rude. Can one obtain references? Are there other references? How is an inspector going to help me?

E

That is gained through experience. Begin with a referral from a friend or relative or just search through this forum for someone from your area and read his posts. You can often gauge an inspector's ability through his writings.

The inspector can help you by monitoring the installation and using his knowledge of proper building practices to confirm that the work is being completed properly. Like I said...I have very seldom seen a shingle roof that was properly installed.

Marc

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Thank you all for your thoughts and suggestions.

Three follow-up questions:

2) how does one know they have a good inspector and/or one they can trust? Forgive me, I don't mean to be rude. Can one obtain references? Are there other references? How is an inspector going to help me?

E

That is gained through experience. Begin with a referral from a friend or relative or just search through this forum for someone from your area and read his posts. You can often gauge an inspector's ability through his writings.

The inspector can help you by monitoring the installation and using his knowledge of proper building practices to confirm that the work is being completed properly. Like I said...I have very seldom seen a shingle roof that was properly installed.

Marc

Every once in a while, I'll google "home inspector" and then spend a few hours perusing web sites of inspectors all over the country and looking at their report formats and how they write their reports. Based on the majority of the sample reports I read on websites, I'd say that the majority of home inspectors who have websites don't know much more about roofs than what the average consumer sees on This Old House; I think some even know less about roofs than the average consumer.

OP, talk to your friends and co-workers and find a roofer who they've used and recommend and who is willing to provide you references. Same for an inspector. If they are unwilling to provide references and show you examples of their work, don't hire them.

Roof maintenance is simple; keep the roof free of tree debris and moss or algae but DO NOT PRESSURE WASH THE ROOF USING HIGH PRESSURE or you'll either take years off it's service life or ruin it. Keep your gutters clean and properly pitched and aligned and your downspouts clear. Inspect the cover annually (stay off the roof when it's wet, icy or it's extremely hot outside), ensure that the fasteners holding the flashings in place haven't backed out, rusted out or been damaged and touchup any sealant on exposed nailheads with a sealant that's compatible with the roofing material. If you've got neoprene rubber plumbing vent bibs, periodically spray some rubber lubricant/protectant on them to shield them from UV and slow down weather rot.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

P.S.

If some guy shows up at your door offering to pressure-wash your roof for $XXX.XX, yell, "Marty, one of them roof cleaning guys is here. Bring the shotgun, NOW!"

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