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Watch those Aluminum porchs


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Ron,

Forgive this novice but I have some questions about this. One of my biggest confusions is your image, I can't quite make out what I'm looking at here. I recognize a stucco wall, some 2X4 framing with some plywood nailed across it with some nails coming through. I can also see the two wires but that's about it.

I can't tell which way is up in this picture. Is the meter attached to the other side of that plywood? Is that a service mast on the wall?

I also cannot make out the split bolts. Can you educate to me what these are, where and how they are used and how they should have been installed?

The area with the leaves and whatever those white things are really has me stumped. What is all that and is this a feed that is close to the ground?

Very confused, sorry.

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Hi Stan,

It threw me for a loop too, but after a few seconds I was able to figure it out. I think you're looking at the surface of an aluminum shed roof of a porch underneath the overhanging eave of a gable end wall that is covered with tree debris. The white slats you're seeing on the lower left are the high ribs of the roof.

You've got a strike there with the exposed split bolts lying on that aluminum roof. Split bolts are splicing devices that are just what they are named - a split bolt wherein two wires are overlapped in the center of a slotted bolt and held in place by a nut tightened down on the bolt.

The split bolt is supposed to be heavily wrapped with tape and there are rules about the drip loop at the strike, which should not be resting on the roof. If a hot cable has an exposed split bolt and is resting on wet debris on an aluminum roof it could make for a pretty 'hot' situation for anyone stepping onto that roof or trying to clean out any gutters attached to it.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Mike,

Thanks for responding to the questions for me....[:-thumbu], I have a family issue with my aging mother and have not been able to check the post for a couple of days. Of course you are right on the money as always. I have watched others post pics similar and it was my turn to find something lurking to ambush.

Almost as scarey was the Federal fuse box on the other end of the weatherhead. No cover and a missing fuse...not burnt out mind you....missing, it was an open hole just about thumb size. I put a burnt out fuse in the socket and taped a cardboard box over the open panel. Yuck.. Are triple taps allowed with fuses?[:-dunce]

Stan, I am a newbie and learn alot on this site.

Great group of people, willing to help us new guys out.

Thanks guys

Ron

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Originally posted by Renron

. . . Almost as scarey was the Federal fuse box on the other end of the weatherhead. No cover and a missing fuse...not burnt out mind you....missing, it was an open hole just about thumb size. I put a burnt out fuse in the socket and taped a cardboard box over the open panel. . .

You might want to rethink that cardboard thing next time. Saving someone from being zapped is certainly a good idea, but if one of those connections were to seriously overheat or of something were to arc in there, the cardboard could easily catch fire.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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