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Vinyl detail above garage door picture


Ben H
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Went and looked at a friends house yesterday with some major wood/termite damage on the top jam of a vehicle door.

I'm looking for some form of a document or a detailed cut away of the proper way to install siding above the garage door that I can print for them.

The siding guys just laid the J channel on top of an untreated 2x that acts as the top jam piece. Can't see any house wrap, or z flashing. It's a disaster.

The thing that's really bad is termites 10ft in the air. Don't know about you boys, but it doesn't rain termites here.

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Went and looked at a friends house yesterday with some major wood/termite damage on the top jam of a vehicle door.

I'm looking for some form of a document or a detailed cut away of the proper way to install siding above the garage door that I can print for them.

If the top jamb piece projects beyond the plane of the siding, it's supposed to be flashed per IRC 703.8(4). Also, look at the installation instructions for the type of siding that's on the house. The proper way to install it above the garage door isn't any different than the proper way to install it on the rest of the house.

The siding guys just laid the J channel on top of an untreated 2x that acts as the top jam piece. Can't see any house wrap, or z flashing. It's a disaster.

Is there any visible damage from the lack of flashing or paper? This is one area where, if the wall is leaking, you're going to see the water stains.

The thing that's really bad is termites 10ft in the air. Don't know about you boys, but it doesn't rain termites here.

As Scott said, the termites don't care. They've got a straight shot from the earth, up the side jambs, and across the horizontal jamb. Vertical distance means nothing to them.

Are you trying to link the poor siding installation with the termites? Unless these are dampwood termites, the two issues are unrelated. You might as well blame the termite infestation on the fact that the siding installer used the wrong nails. You should be looking at the bottom of the side jambs.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Are you trying to link the poor siding installation with the termites? Unless these are dampwood termites, the two issues are unrelated. You might as well blame the termite infestation on the fact that the siding installer used the wrong nails. You should be looking at the bottom of the side jambs.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Subterranean termites, at least the ones found here (middle eastern subterranean) are attracted to moist or decaying wood.

Marc

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No, not trying to link anything. I'm sure the crap siding job held water for years, thats what brought the bugs in. (Like Marc said)

I'm gonna get by there next week and take some siding off for them to get a closer peek. I'll see about getting a few pictures. My fear is the termites didn't pass up the first 15 of wall to get to the discovered spot.

I was able to peel back the J channel enough to see the bottom 1/2 of OSB in one spot, it's shot. I'd guess the first foot or so above the door at best will need to be replaced.

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Are you trying to link the poor siding installation with the termites? Unless these are dampwood termites, the two issues are unrelated. You might as well blame the termite infestation on the fact that the siding installer used the wrong nails. You should be looking at the bottom of the side jambs.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Subterranean termites, at least the ones found here (middle eastern subterranean) are attracted to moist or decaying wood.

Marc

Oh, they're attracted to it here as well, but rotting wood 8' up in the air doesn't call to them. They were already in the structure when they found the wet spot.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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. . . I was able to peel back the J channel enough to see the bottom 1/2 of OSB in one spot, it's shot. I'd guess the first foot or so above the door at best will need to be replaced.

The real danger is that the header is damaged. Sheathing is easy to fix. 17' long Headers aren't.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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. . . I was able to peel back the J channel enough to see the bottom 1/2 of OSB in one spot, it's shot. I'd guess the first foot or so above the door at best will need to be replaced.

The real danger is that the header is damaged. Sheathing is easy to fix. 17' long Headers aren't.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I agree. I have the feeling they're going to ask me to repair it. I also have the feeling they are not going to like what it will cost.

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  • 1 month later...

Ben

Here is a diagram of installation for the manufactured type door jamb surrounds.

http://toolbelt.buildiq.com/tool-docs/S ... oorSBS.pdf

It goes in much the same as a window.

If you are replacing the jamb and have to bend your own metal trims just add a drip at the head that has a two inch upturn and tape it in properly as you would a window. make sure you do not use ACQ for the door buck as it will cause any aluminum to degrade.

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