Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
NJinspector

Stucco Mess

Recommended Posts

I'll be calling for a Stucco inspection to see what the conditon of the sheating is behind this, but what should they have done at the soffit? Backer rod and flexible seal there as well??

BTW, the owner is a "certified" stucco guy

Click to Enlarge
tn_201122135031_2806%20County%20House%20rd%20009.jpg

42.86 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201122135148_2806%20County%20House%20rd%20018.jpg

37 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201122135333_2806%20County%20House%20rd%20030.jpg

39.19 KB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like EIFS, not stucco... and the open cell styrofoam is just stuck to whatever siding was underneath it. I bet there still is an air gap hidden deep under there somewhere. When was the house built?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be calling for a Stucco inspection to see what the conditon of the sheating is behind this, but what should they have done at the soffit? Backer rod and flexible seal there as well??

For traditional stucco, I don't have any installation detail diagrams that show any sealant or other accessory used where it terminates at protected soffits.

That looks like EIFS, not stucco... and the open cell styrofoam is just stuck to whatever siding was underneath it. I bet there still is an air gap hidden deep under there somewhere. When was the house built?

Where do you see any indication it's EIFS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For traditional stucco, I don't have any installation detail diagrams that show any sealant or other accessory used where it terminates at protected soffits.

Yeah. My AWCI Plaster/Stucco Manual doesn't have it either and that's troubling. I recall Mike O saying something to the effect that cementitious stucco against wood window/door trim was a disaster in the making. I can see how it wouldn't be a big deal on structural masonry, ICF walls or some other type of 'mass wall' construction that breathes moisture but for wood framing, I have to agree with Mike despite a lack of supporting documentation.

Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, wasnt EIFS. That finish is thin, either rolled on or sprayed on but its a hard coat base underneath. You can see the metal lath where the electrical service comes through.

EIFS is thinner than traditional stucco, but the metal lathe is confusing. EIFS used to be defined as 'polymer based' but these days you can find polymer reinforced traditional stucco. The lines between traditional stucco and EIFS is becoming so diffused that even AWCI doesn't know how to classify some of the variations coming out these days.

Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are seeing a lot more of the acrylic over a cementitous base, rather than over insulation. This two coat system is quicker than the "pure stucco's" three coat.

This document (from the EIFS Council of Canada) could be useful for a EIFS situation, if this were that, but it isn't.

It suggests that:

"Include [13] mm minimum expansion joint between EIFS and adjacent materials."

http://www.eifscouncil.org/images/07240 ... cation.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For starters, he should have applied his stucco before the aluminum soffit, I doubt tradition intended it to terminate against aluminum panels. Then he should have hired a 'certified' tin knocker because that metal work is lousy.

Gibsonguy might be right about this being a retrofit installation, it looks like they peeled off the siding and plastered right up to the old trim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see the metal lath in the 3rd pic now. It's just a bad retrofit that made me think of the EIFS. It appears as if there could be a base under the acrylic finish be it insulation or cementitious, which makes the wall stick out further that the original, or it is simply just installed directly over the existing wall.

As I wasn't there, I couldn't feel it myself to know if there is any give in the finish or not. I would never mention EIFS in the report unless I was sure. It is obvious though that the trim and soffits were not removed when the exterior finish was redone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be considered EIFS you need to have the insulation board. You can also have the insulation board with DEFS (Direct applied Exterior Finish System). You also have PB(polymer based) and PM(polymer modified).PB is more flexible and PM is hard almost like cementitious stucco. The lamina(finish coat) on EIFS and DEFS is acrylic and can also be found on cementitious stucco.

In the picture I see what really looks like the stucco is a retrofit onto who knows what. For starters the windows are wrong, they have no header flashing and I see no sealants around the windows. The stucco should never touch the soffits, or other dissimilar materials. I also do not see any control joints, but then I also do not find them all that often on stucco homes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See 7.1.4

IBC

2510.3 Installation. Installation of these materials shall be in

compliance with ASTM C 926 and ASTM C 1063.

IRC

R703.6 Exterior plaster. Installation of these materials shall

be in compliance with ASTM C 926 and ASTM C 1063 and the

provisions of this code.

ASTM C 926

7. Application

7.1 General:

7.1.1 Portland cement plaster shall be applied by hand or

machine to the nominal thickness specified in Table 1.

7.1.2 Plaster nominal thickness shall be measured from the

back plane of the metal plaster base, exclusive of ribs or

dimples, or from the face of the solid backing with or without

metal plaster base, to the outer surface exclusive of texture

variations.

7.1.3 Portland cement-based plaster shall be applied on

furred metal plaster base when the surface of solid backing

consists of gypsum board, gypsum plaster, wood, or rigid foam

board-type products.

NOTE 5—On horizontal ceiling supports or roof soffits protected by a

drip edge, gypsum board products shall be permitted to be used as backing

for metal base to receive portland cement plaster.

7.1.4 Separation shall be provided where plaster abuts

dissimilar construction materials or openings. (See A2.1.4.)

(A2.1.4 is for interior plaster.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally! ASTM C 926 likely addresses other issues that I can't resolve elsewhere. Looks like I need a copy of it.

Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The stucco should never touch the soffits, or other dissimilar materials.

Can you show us a reference for never touching a soffit?

patt, beat me to it. Beside being an ASTM guideline it is also found with most of the manufacturers guidelines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally! ASTM C 926 likely addresses other issues that I can't resolve elsewhere. Looks like I need a copy of it.

Marc

Mark if you look at any amount of stucco, you really should have a copy of both C1063 and C926.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...