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Moisture in Poured Foundation Wall?


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This house was built in 1958. As you can see from the pictures there is an unusual pattern in the concrete on both the inside and outside of the foundation. This is only at the back left corner, not on either side or the right corner area. On the outside if you rub your finger over these areas the concrete breaks off in sand size particles. On the inside nothing is coming off. I may be wrong but it seems fairly straight forward that moisture is wicking down from the top of the poured foundation causing the concrete to break up. I guess it is similar to spalling in bricks. Has anyone seen this before? Is there a name for it? Is there a fix for it? How big of a concern is it? How would you right it up? You know all the usually questions when you find something for the first time.

I remember a thread a few weeks ago started by Kurt that mentioned a product used to seal concrete, but Kurt was asking about its use in a stone foundation. Would that product be a good for sealing this wall, or do we even want to seal the wall.

Thanks ya’ll!

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Looks like the mud was vibrated too much 60 years ago. On second thought, I don't remember ever seeing anyone using a vibrator that long ago, so there was probably an over exuberant fellow walking along the top of the forms with a 2 by 4 ramming it up and down more than was necessary.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Looks like the mud was vibrated too much 60 years ago. On second thought, I don't remember ever seeing anyone using a vibrator that long ago, so there was probably an over exuberant fellow walking along the top of the forms with a 2 by 4 ramming it up and down more than was necessary.

Either that or it was raining cats & dogs when they placed that wall.

The picture shows history, not an ongoing water problem.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Hi Mark,

Just noticed that I never answered your second question.

Kurt was talking about Xypex, a crystaline waterproofing material (CWM).

Yes, you could use Xypex on that wall but you'd first want to fill all of those voids by wetting down the wall and packing them with hydraulic cement; then you'd wet down the wall top to bottom end end to end and coat it with the CWM using a masonry brush. It's a catalyst and will cause crystals to form in the first 3 - 4 inches of concrete from the surface. It will stop water molecules but it will not stop water vapor molecules. That shouldn't really be an issue though.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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