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Gap between panel and cover


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I'm sure this gap between the panel cover and the panel itself is wrong, but what code section might I reference if I need to? 110.12(A) ?

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or 312.3

Keep in mind that Chad once said that drywall is a combustible material, if memory serves correctly. That would imply flush mounting, not recessed.

Marc

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or 312.3

Keep in mind that Chad once said that drywall is a combustible material, if memory serves correctly. That would imply flush mounting, not recessed.

Marc

Thank you, Marc.

Did they set it back like this so they can shut that door over the face of the panel to hide it?

Douglas Hansen

Yes, exactly.

Was/Is there a deadfront cover under the wood door? Actually I think that was Douglas' intent as well.

Yes, the panel cover fits perfectly underneath the wood enclosure. This still allows about a 5/8" gap between the panel cabinet and the panel cover.

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For electrical boxes, it makes a difference whether or not the wall surface material is considered combustible, and for that application gypsum board is considered noncombustible in the NEC. If the wall surface is wood or other combustible material, the box must be flush with or proud of the surface. If the wall surface is gypsum board, the maximum setback is 1/4 inch. (314.20)

For electrical panels, the surface material is not the determining factor; what matters is the combustibility of the wall structure. Panels in wood-framed walls must be flush with or proud of the surface. Panels in steel-stud walls with a gypsum board surface are allowed a maximum setback of 1/4 inch. (312.3)

Douglas Hansen

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For electrical boxes, it makes a difference whether or not the wall surface material is considered combustible, and for that application gypsum board is considered noncombustible in the NEC. If the wall surface is wood or other combustible material, the box must be flush with or proud of the surface. If the wall surface is gypsum board, the maximum setback is 1/4 inch. (314.20)

For electrical panels, the surface material is not the determining factor; what matters is the combustibility of the wall structure. Panels in wood-framed walls must be flush with or proud of the surface. Panels in steel-stud walls with a gypsum board surface are allowed a maximum setback of 1/4 inch. (312.3)

Douglas Hansen

Thanks Douglas. Where's the emoticon of someone bowing down and saying "I'm not worthy" ?

- Reuben

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