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John Dirks Jr

counter top mitre cut wrong?

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The cabinets are level and even both ways. When the tips of the counter top touch evenly at the ends, there's a significant gap in the middle section. When I move one piece back far enough so the backsplashes do not intersect, the gap lines up perfectly.

Again, cabinets and tops are level. I'm not even playing with the wall intersection yet. To get the gaps closed at the mitre, I have to lift the ends of the tops way up making them slope away from each other.

I'm trying to figure out which one or if both of these pieces are off and trying to decide how to procede.

Should I return them both or attempt fixing the issue myself somehow?

front end lined up

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backend lined up

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gap shown with ends lined up

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offset backsplash and the gap closes

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difference at backsplash top corners with seam tight along length of tops

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Pre-mitered post-formed countertops used to line up pretty well for me. But they'd always be at exactly 90 degrees when the walls I was working with never were at 90 degrees, so I'd usually end up cutting new miters myself.

If your walls are at 90 degrees, send back those countertops; they're screwed up. If your walls aren't at 90 degrees, build a jig & cut new miters yourself.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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It looks to me like the problem is being caused at the top of the backsplash. Some very careful sanding or grinding of one or both in that area would likely fix the problem. I would do it, but, as that might negate the ability to return them, I'll leave that decision to you.

What's the material?

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I'd take it back.

I've done more formica work than I care to remember. Cutting or trimming your own miters on a post formed counter can be daunting, even if you're good at it.

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What they said. Take it back. It looks like Ray Charles cut it.

The only way you're going to get it right is with a belt sander and I doubt you want to take that challenge if you haven't done it before.

Did they bother to rout out the bottom for dog bone bolts to suck it together?

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It's either or both of two things:

1) The backsplash plumb cuts on the CT are not at a perfect right angle to the surface of the CT.

2) One or both of your cabinet rows on either side of that inside wall corner is rising slightly, causing the backsplash plumb cuts to meet at the top instead of evenly.

Try shimming both CT pieces in unison at the point where they meet to elevate the seam a little. You may have to add shims at points further from the seam to restore support to the fields of the two CT halves.

John, when you are able to match prefabed countertops like that perfectly, you are carpenter extraordinaire! I can't do it.

Marc

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This thing solved the problem. The local shop sliced the mitres and cut each end to my specified length for a total of $25.

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They are just sitting in place in these pictures without even being bolted yet. Tight like they should be.

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On to the next task.....

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John, when you are able to match prefabed countertops like that perfectly, you are carpenter extraordinaire! I can't do it.

Not really, Mark. That was a mess. It's the same as anything else. Do enough of it and you learn the tricks.

John,

If you can get your hands on a biscuit / plate joiner, carefully cut slots in to the ends between the DB slots, do not glue them in and snug the dog bones. Don't over tighten them.

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John, when you are able to match prefabed countertops like that perfectly, you are carpenter extraordinaire! I can't do it.

Not really, Mark. That was a mess. It's the same as anything else. Do enough of it and you learn the tricks.

John,

If you can get your hands on a biscuit / plate joiner, carefully cut slots in to the ends between the DB slots, do not glue them in and snug the dog bones. Don't over tighten them.

Thanks for the tips. I'm taking it nice and easy to minimize screw ups. I'm putting together under cabinet duct work now. These new cabinets against the opposite wall occupied a space where the original register is.

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