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This is on a very old house. There were 4 other fire places and chimneys. I don't think there was every a fire place where this "chimney" is located. I've nver seen one capped like this and I want to think it was always like this, but why is my questions.

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Where that chimney sits (centered on the ridge of that brick section of the house) tells me that there once was a fireplace below or at least a flue for a stove. I see the house in front of the brick section is made of stone. Is the stone section the oldest?

Someone has had their way with the roof lines, you could almost call it rape.

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This is on a very old house. There were 4 other fire places and chimneys. I don't think there was every a fire place where this "chimney" is located. I've nver seen one capped like this and I want to think it was always like this, but why is my questions.

You're probably right, because the chimney is only about 13" x 21" leaving a flue of about 5" x 13", which is not a typical flue demension even in colonial times. Eight inches seems to be about as small as one ever sees as a depth of a working flue. And, the work seems to be pretty consistant - no obvious mismatching mortar. My guess is that it's an architectural feature - a dummy.

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