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Brandon Whitmore

New wuss- mobile

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Well, after some consideration, I've decided to downsize from my Nissan Titan to a Jeep Patriot.

The new ride's rated at 23 mpg city and 29 mpg hwy, but some guys have posted that they are getting up to the mid 30's once the rig is broken in. I got 25.5 mpg's with my first break in tank of fuel (mixed driving), which whoops the mileage I was getting with the Nissan at 12 mpg average. Also, service intervals are much greater, consumables such as tires and oil will be much cheaper, etc.

I won't be able to pack as much stuff in this rig, and have already traded in my 6' step ladder for a Gorilla. I have my Telesteps tossed in as well, only for those times when no other ladder will work.

If I can remember not to pull out in front of traffic any more, I may survive, because I've gone from 305+hp/ 290 ft.lbs torque down to 156hp/140ft.lbs. [:-turtle]

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Mighty fine looking vehicle. Are those bungee cords holding down the ladder? You don't think the wind will play with the ladder?

Marc

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Thanks Marc,

The tie downs are these: Rok Straps

The ladder doesn't budge laterally or vertically, at least not when tested using my muscle/ body weight on it, nor while driving up to 75 mph so far. If any of you have a permanent solution, please let me know.

I started out using them on my motorcycles, and decided they work so well, I'd use them to hold the ladder on. It's a temp. solution until I have my metal fab. buddy come up with something permanent.

I've used a form of bungee straps for the last 10+ years without issue.

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Smart Move,

I've never understood why some folks in this business have such big trucks with such big power plants. It's not like those big engines are going to get you to the job any sooner or enable you to park the vehicle in tight underground parking any easier.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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You'll get use to the advantages of a smaller vehicle. One thing, parking is easier.

My '98 Cherokee has 130k on the ticker. I'm keepin it to beyond 200k before I think about ditching it. I just put a new evap core and heater core in it so the AC is finally working. That was a hell of a job but now the AC is ice cold.

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Smart Move,

I've never understood why some folks in this business have such big trucks with such big power plants. It's not like those big engines are going to get you to the job any sooner or enable you to park the vehicle in tight underground parking any easier.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

I use my 3/4 ton Dodge Cummins diesel to pull a 24' van trailer and a 19' open trailer at times. At 20-21 mpg on the highway and an engine good for half a million miles or more, it ain't so bad. People call on me when they move.

If it weren't for that need, I'd look for something like Brandon's.

Marc

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Hi Marc,

While I understand the need for something like that to pull the van trailer; for the additional convenience that the smaller vehicle affords me, I'd probably park it and use a smaller vehicle to do inspections. Of course, that's me. Different strokes for different folks.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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2000 Plymouth Voyager with 318,000 on it so far. 21 MPG mixed use last time I checked a month or so ago.

Fits my Little Giant and WGML just fine.

Smooth riding floating down the highway.

My butt fits the seat REAL well!

-

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My ladder solution is a piece of rope. But it's a special piece of rope. A bungy cord provides tension, but if it pops off, the rope is there.

But you'll want something more elegant for that new rig. I do suggest altering that rack so your ladder sits lower. It is not helping your fuel consumption.

My ride is getting old. I will replace it someday with another one just like it, four banger automatic.

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But you'll want something more elegant for that new rig. I do suggest altering that rack so your ladder sits lower. It is not helping your fuel consumption.

Before purchasing the Jeep, I went over the the lot and took measurements to ensure everything would fit-- mainly the extension ladder. I then posted on some Jeep forums, and while nobody had seen the installation of an extension ladder done, they couldn't come up with any reason why it wouldn't work-- I was the guinea pig.

What I did not take into consideration is that the rear hatch opens up into the ladder unless it's set up high and pushed as far forward as possible. Until I bough the roof basket, I could not open the rear hatch at all.....it was like I didn't have a door there, and was a PITA. I had originally figured I could just use the cross bars and be good to go.

So unfortunately, I'll have to deal with what is hopefully just a slight hit in fuel consumption.

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Hi,

I'd push the ladder farther forward. I had the same problem with the Dodge Caravan I had when I first got into this business in 1996. It was the basic 4-cyl model and was pretty short. Fully retracted, my extension ladder barely fit within the length of the vehicle between the front and rear bumpers and I had to push it far forward to prevent it from dinging the tailgate. It took a little getting used to that ladder extending over the entire hood, and I had to strap it down very tightly to my rack, but after a week or two I didn't even realize it was there anymore and it never hindered my driving.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I've been hauling a long ladder on a similar setup for a while now. I notice less wind resistance with the long ladder jutting out front, believe it or not.

I think without it there, all the wind sweeps up over the windshield and slams into the roof rack causing drag and turbulance. With the ladder jutting out it breaks the wind prior to the rack and the ride is significantly smoother, quieter with less pushing back by wind.

I use a U type bike lock to hold the front down (secure from theft too) and bungee's at the back end.

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I'd push the ladder farther forward. I had the same problem with the Dodge Caravan I had when I first got into this business in 1996. It was the basic 4-cyl model and was pretty short. Fully retracted, my extension ladder barely fit within the length of the vehicle between the front and rear bumpers and I had to push it far forward to prevent it from dinging the tailgate. It took a little getting used to that ladder extending over the entire hood, and I had to strap it down very tightly to my rack, but after a week or two I didn't even realize it was there anymore and it never hindered my driving.

I may give that a shot, since I'll only have to push it forward a few more inches to be completely out of the way of the hatch. First, I'm going to head over to the metal fab man and see what he thinks he can do with this set up.

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Locks are smart. An HI buddy of mine had his 40' aluminum ladder stolen from atop his truck while parked in front of his lawyer's office at mid day on Main Street about 3 blocks from where I live. What kind of a getaway could anyone hope to make with a 40 footer?

Lock 'em up.

Jim

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All this talk about inspection vehicles has got me wondering. To what degree does the average client tend to base his take on the inspector by what he drives?

I doubt any of the brethren would feel comfy being seen in Jethro's double-decker, open-air ride.

Marc

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Locks are smart. An HI buddy of mine had his 40' aluminum ladder stolen from atop his truck while parked in front of his lawyer's office at mid day on Main Street about 3 blocks from where I live. What kind of a getaway could anyone hope to make with a 40 footer?

Lock 'em up.

Jim

Into the alley, then up onto the roof? Vis vest and a helmet. No, I'll delete this, shouldn't give out ideas like that.

Yeah, John. I like the lock.

Hey, want your ladder to stop singing a monotone in the key of C flat on the hiway? I squirted some expanding foam into the rung holes.

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To what degree does the average client tend to base his take on the inspector by what he drives?

By the time they see my wheels, they've already booked the job.

But I think you need to look like you're successful enough to have a decent set of wheels. That's why most people drive cars they can't quite afford.

I know I should trade up, but I doubt if it will increase biz enough to cover the cost.

Maybe I'll just keep the '98 and put a collector plate on it for fun.

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Yeah,

People don't see my rig until I roll up on site. There have been a few times lately when clients have said to me something like, "I like your little car (or truck). I heard about it from so-and-so when they told me about you." It's a nice compact little vehicle. When folks say, "I like your truck," I tell 'em, "Smile when you call my car a truck." When they say, "I like your car," I tell 'em, "Smile when you call my truck a car." It gets a chuckle and it breaks the ice.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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All this talk about inspection vehicles has got me wondering. To what degree does the average client tend to base his take on the inspector by what he drives?

I doubt any of the brethren would feel comfy being seen in Jethro's double-decker, open-air ride.

Marc

There are a lot of studies that have shown folks make big judgments about other folks based on their car. This also goes for clothing, hair, house, etc. People care a lot about what doesn't matter.

If you're in business, it's smart to have a ride that's clean and reasonably presentable.

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All this talk about inspection vehicles has got me wondering. To what degree does the average client tend to base his take on the inspector by what he drives?

I doubt any of the brethren would feel comfy being seen in Jethro's double-decker, open-air ride.

Marc

There are a lot of studies that have shown folks make big judgments about other folks based on their car. This also goes for clothing, hair, house, etc. People care a lot about what doesn't matter.

If you're in business, it's smart to have a ride that's clean and reasonably presentable.

Malcolm Gladwell explains how we make these quick decisions ad nauseum in Blink. To most people, a nice ride = success, and a person that's good at his job. Not that I'm saying that's how it should be . . .

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All this talk about inspection vehicles has got me wondering. To what degree does the average client tend to base his take on the inspector by what he drives?

I doubt any of the brethren would feel comfy being seen in Jethro's double-decker, open-air ride.

Marc

There are a lot of studies that have shown folks make big judgments about other folks based on their car. This also goes for clothing, hair, house, etc. People care a lot about what doesn't matter.

If you're in business, it's smart to have a ride that's clean and reasonably presentable.

Malcolm Gladwell explains how we make these quick decisions ad nauseum in Blink. To most people, a nice ride = success, and a person that's good at his job. Not that I'm saying that's how it should be . . .
Guess I had it figured out.

I'd noticed that realtors - even the ones who're dirt poor and aren't selling many homes - like to drive expensive cars. I'd always figured it was some kind of psychological thing that says to potential clients, "Look at how successful I am. If you hire me to sell your home or help you find a new home, you too will be very successful."

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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. . . I'd noticed that realtors - even the ones who're dirt poor and aren't selling many homes - like to drive expensive cars. I'd always figured it was some kind of psychological thing that says to potential clients, "Look at how successful I am. If you hire me to sell your home or help you find a new home, you too will be very successful."

Unfortunately, the polyester suit gives them away. . .

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