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Hot breaker and liquid on wire


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CoolSigns,

Where did you get the new I7 for $1695? Not refurbished?

One thing to remember when using the I7. IR cams see surface temp, not moisture. Even without a change in moisture content, the image of a ceiling or wall can change significantly based on the time of the day the picture is taken.

Keep participating here. This is one of the best places to learn. Don't be shy as its better to make a mistake here than out there. Make sure you can back up whatever you report.

Transcat

I called and encouraged them to give me a 15% discount. If you are interested, I can put you in contact with the right person. Yes New.

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NICEIC, IEE, BCA all have three things in common, temperature.

KISS theory

1) only one of these wires showed this occurrence.

2) at what temperature do these two solids turn to a liquid?

3) how long does it take for the liquid to change back to a solid?

4) no liquid or solid at the bottom of the box below the drip.

5) how long has this liquid drip been sitting there?

Kind of a simple but extreme example of reference: Candle wax at a specific temperature will change from a solid to a liquid and a short time later back to a solid.

I'm understanding that these two materials react at a specific temperature causing the two solids to create or become a liquid. Which in turn is losing solid mass. Again extreme example: A 6" solid wire and its solid covering through this reaction caused by temperature now changes to a liquid, falls off and leaves the remaining solid wire and its solid covering now measuring 5".

At the site I had touched my screwdriver to the drip causing some of this liquid to cover the screwdriver tip surface. After approx 15 minutes I used a paper towel to probe the liquid. It appeared to becoming as a solid form.

Last night I was confident in the forums response that I over reacted. This morning with the new found information, I am now believing that these findings are relatively new and require an inspection by a qualified electrician. I would much rather have a client pay $50 to $200 for an electrician to tell them there is a problem or the HI is full of sh_t. In either case the liability now rest on the electricians shoulders. And if the client demands me to pay for an electrician to say that I'm overreacting. Fine, I will gladly pay. As this is rare and I know electricity and liquid to not play well together.

Your thoughts?

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NICEIC, IEE, BCA all have three things in common, temperature.

KISS theory

1) only one of these wires showed this occurrence.

2) at what temperature do these two solids turn to a liquid?

As I understand it, the solid is not turning into a liquid, the liquid (a plasticizer) is just separating from the PVC compound. According to one cite, it can happen slowly over a long period of time with no heat, or more quickly, at a higher temperature. All cites agree that the loss of plasticizer is not particularly important to the performance of the wire after it's installed.

3) how long does it take for the liquid to change back to a solid?

It doesn't. Once exuded, it stays exuded. It isn't like a melted candle.

4) no liquid or solid at the bottom of the box below the drip.

5) how long has this liquid drip been sitting there?

There's no way to know.

Kind of a simple but extreme example of reference: Candle wax at a specific temperature will change from a solid to a liquid and a short time later back to a solid.

That is most certainly not what is happening. It's more like a bit of water that's oozed out of cheese. The cheese is drier and less plastic, but otherwise unaffected. The water never turns into cheese.

I'm understanding that these two materials react at a specific temperature causing the two solids to create or become a liquid. Which in turn is losing solid mass. Again extreme example: A 6" solid wire and its solid covering through this reaction caused by temperature now changes to a liquid, falls off and leaves the remaining solid wire and its solid covering now measuring 5".

No. You're understanding is incorrect.

At the site I had touched my screwdriver to the drip causing some of this liquid to cover the screwdriver tip surface. After approx 15 minutes I used a paper towel to probe the liquid. It appeared to becoming as a solid form.

You imagined it. I have encountered this stuff several times. It never turns back into a solid.

Last night I was confident in the forums response that I over reacted. This morning with the new found information, I am now believing that these findings are relatively new and require an inspection by a qualified electrician. I would much rather have a client pay $50 to $200 for an electrician to tell them there is a problem or the HI is full of sh_t. In either case the liability now rest on the electricians shoulders. And if the client demands me to pay for an electrician to say that I'm overreacting. Fine, I will gladly pay. As this is rare and I know electricity and liquid to not play well together.

Your thoughts?

There's nothing wrong with having an electrician look it over and decide whether or not to split up the circuit. If I found a single breaker serving a kitchen counter and a furnace, I might do the same.

But I think it's nuts to call this a dangerous situation or to recommend shutting down the circuit till the electrician gets there.

After you've done a few thousand inspections, I suspect that you'll look back and feel the same way.

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You imagined it. I have encountered this stuff several times. It never turns back into a solid.

I'll give into that

But I think it's nuts to call this a dangerous situation or to recommend shutting down the circuit till the electrician gets there.

I shut the circuit off then turned it back on after the ac was shut off completly so not to overload the circuit. I called the next day to apologized for my incompetents and have them run the ac as usual.

After you've done a few thousand inspections, I suspect that you'll look back and feel the same way.

I'm looking forward to it.

Thank you for explaining this in a manner that was understandable to me.

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