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Mike Lamb

HI Artography - Barn

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This is the "attic" of a barn for horses. There were about 20 stables beneath. I don't know why they have to be so huge. I will have to consult Freud. Barn envy?

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Horses, any livestock really, need lot's of feed and bedding. All that bulky stuff has to go somewhere.

That's why it's not a barn attic - it's called a hay maw.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Horses, any livestock really, need lot's of feed and bedding. All that bulky stuff has to go somewhere.

That's why it's not a barn attic - it's called a hay maw.
It's a haymow. Maw is what the farmer calls the wife.

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Use to stack up hay in them things. Tons of fun and lots of places for a kid to make hidden forts, paths & rooms. Of course, as I grew up, I learned other uses for those spaces.

-

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Use to stack up hay in them things. Tons of fun and lots of places for a kid to make hidden forts, paths & rooms. Of course, as I grew up, I learned other uses for those spaces.

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Hm... that brings back memories... we used to put the flatbed truck in granny gear and let it creep down through the field. One of us would throw the bails up to the other, who stacked 'em on the flatbed- no driver - and no break. Granny gear was the dictator. It was a hump...

Cool shot, BTW, Mike.

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I used to help out haying, you got the farm boy sunburn and that sweaty rash on the arms, yep, that's the first real day of summer.

I was always on the truck after the first two rows, couldn't throw a bale up without having it hang up and fall apart. My friend's dad would throw bales until the stack got too tall. Then he'd start pitching them up with a fork.

The barn always had a half a dozen cats in it. They got some milk and that was it, go catch a rat. There must have been plenty of those too.

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I used to help out haying, you got the farm boy sunburn and that sweaty rash on the arms, yep, that's the first real day of summer.

I was always on the truck after the first two rows, couldn't throw a bale up without having it hang up and fall apart. My friend's dad would throw bales until the stack got too tall. Then he'd start pitching them up with a fork.

The barn always had a half a dozen cats in it. They got some milk and that was it, go catch a rat. There must have been plenty of those too.

I'm sure the only reason it came easy to me was because it beat the heck out of toting cinder block and bricks - light work... [:-thumbu]

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Mid to late 60's. My seven year old brother was the field tractor "steerer" while my cousin and I humped the bales onto the trailer and stacked them, taking turns of course. We got a nickel a bale for putting it on the trailer and then stacking it in the stack yard. More to get it in the loft. Cuz got 2, I got 2, and little brother got one for steering without running over the bales.

Stacked em about 10 high on a low boy hay sled.

What you'd get?

-

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Tossing hay bales, what fun. Yesterday we finished tossing 1208 square bales. I was helping my neighbor and his wife. We had some off and on help this week, but mainly it was just us three. Taking a break today. A lot of sunburn and the ever present hay rash in full blown experience here. If the rain holds off, tomorrow we are going to go load up 400 or so square straw bales. Anybody want to help? They get stacked on a 35 foot gooseneck trailer 8 high. The tractor runs in granny low also. One person on the trailer and everybody else on the ground.

Growing up we were always told it was character and discipline building to do it. Now of course, we have better explanations. But teenagers and young adults are too lazy to do this anymore, even for money. Heck, I am not even getting paid. I am just helping out.

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Mid to late 60's. My seven year old brother was the field tractor "steerer" while my cousin and I humped the bales onto the trailer and stacked them, taking turns of course. We got a nickel a bale for putting it on the trailer and then stacking it in the stack yard. More to get it in the loft. Cuz got 2, I got 2, and little brother got one for steering without running over the bales.

Stacked em about 10 high on a low boy hay sled.

What you'd get?

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Early to mid 70's 25 cent a bale. Hauled them on a Chevy truck. 55 bales a load. Stacked in the barn. Alway got feed lunch.

Some places paid better and other not as good.

When I help my uncle at the dairy farm He had a 2 ton flat bed truck he would put in grannie and would not stopped until it was time to tie it off.

We had to take two rows at at time and you would not have to take more then two steps to get to the next bale of hay.

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We got nothing per bale. Lots of Cheri-Aid from the A&P, no Kool-aid in my family! And as a special treat we got to take a bath with Lifeboy soap. Sure smelled good after years of Ivory.

I have worked in the loose hay also. Everyone did not have a baler. Most were wire balers and had their own small engines, no PTOs.

Oh well, all that seems to have been important then and certainly now.

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My brother-in-law's family were hay balers. Towards the end they couldn't afford to pay for help, but there was all the cold beer that you could drink.

My in-law and I had filled his 6 in-line, 3 speed column shift, 1/2 ton pickup with bales as high as we could throw 'em and were headed for the barn. I had to tell him to shift the tranny, he was too 'jolly' to realize that we were doing 60 mph still in 2nd gear. That was a good day. On bad days it might take a while for him to find the door to the truck.

Marc

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