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Darren

Explaining to a new homebuyer

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Sure. I tell 'em to have a long established irrigation company winterize it every fall with the blow out method.

Me too.

On a side bar; I never test a system however I always advise the client to observe the spray pattern. Quite often I see them spraying up against the brickwork of the home.

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I never mention blowing out the system. No one would know how down here. I do tell buyers to winterize down here we simply shut off the water open the testcocks (or remove the backflow) and let the system run one cycle. There are a few more steps to winterize a pump system.

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I never mention blowing out the system. No one would know how down here. I do tell buyers to winterize down here we simply shut off the water open the testcocks (or remove the backflow) and let the system run one cycle. There are a few more steps to winterize a pump system.

Statistics show it doesn't get below freezing too often in Brandon, MS. We get down into single digits every year. Any low spots in pipes or tubing not 3" in the ground won't make it till spring.

The statistics also show that Charles is the 6th of the "most common first names in Brandon, MS among deceased individuals".

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Yep, we have a shallow frost line.

The statistics also show that Bill is the 2nd most common first name among convicted murders in Eastern State Penitentiary.

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Yep. Once we happen upon one of the components and I get the "Whats this". In the same breadth I make them aware that I won't be inspecting any part of it, but they need to contract a professional to winterize it and put it back into action in the spring, if they ever want it to work again.

$8K water bill! [:-bigeyes

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Up in the great State of Mass.

we have underground sprinkler systems on town water.

I go thru a speech about "Fall procedure" then "Spring turnon and orientation of nozzles". Questions are answered about the green box cover and the piping next to the foundation.

Inside the building there is an electric monitoring box with the installers name.

"Call them and make sure you are on their maintenance tour"

I get the Realtor involved in a discussion about 'water bans' in the town. [:-banghea

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Irrigation systems are outside the scope of the inspections I perform, but I will verbally pass on to some home buyers the problems I've seen them cause to buildings.

I believe many home owners overuse them. They set the timers for night time and forget about them. I have seen standing water in crawl spaces from overuse or defective systems. Besides observing the sprinkler heads, I advise them to watch for vegetation that will grow and deflect water back to the building.

Blair

www.axiombuildinginspections.com

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Irrigation systems are outside the scope of the inspections I perform, but I will verbally pass on to some home buyers the problems I've seen them cause to buildings.

I believe many home owners overuse them. They set the timers for night time and forget about them. I have seen standing water in crawl spaces from overuse or defective systems. Besides observing the sprinkler heads, I advise them to watch for vegetation that will grow and deflect water back to the building.

Blair

www.axiombuildinginspections.com

Why would anyone have an irrigation system in Seattle? [;)]

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Irrigation systems are outside the scope of the inspections I perform, but I will verbally pass on to some home buyers the problems I've seen them cause to buildings.

I believe many home owners overuse them. They set the timers for night time and forget about them. I have seen standing water in crawl spaces from overuse or defective systems. Besides observing the sprinkler heads, I advise them to watch for vegetation that will grow and deflect water back to the building.

Blair

www.axiombuildinginspections.com

Why would anyone have an irrigation system in Seattle? [;)]

I ask myself that question all the time; but, believe it or not, we have relatively dry summers here. In fact, I once saw somewhere where they'd documented that more rain falls in Phoenix between May and September than falls in Seattle. We have extremely long 70deg F days most of the summer, it rarely hits 90deg and when it does that's usually for only an hour or two, and there's a ton of stuff to do a stone's throw from one's house.

You don't want to move here though, unless you're prepared to deal with six or seven months of gray days with not a whole lot of sunlight; rain, rain and more rain and the feeling that it's always either nighttime or dusk.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Here's an example of a winter day to which Mike writes. Viewed from the roof of a building, Seattle's iconic symbol is socked by drizzling rain and fades into the cloud cover. Still better that snow.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201246183059_DSC02605.jpg

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