Jump to content

I need some enlightenment


Robert Jones
 Share

Recommended Posts

This home was built in 1980 although I am fairly certain this roof covering has been added after that. It seems to be a fiberglass type material? Anyway, first time for me . Can anyone advise me as to the material type so I can research it a bit.

Thanks.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201182020049_IMGP5019%20(Medium).jpg

79.84 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201182020128_IMGP5027%20(Medium).jpg

56.29 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201182020153_IMGP5022%20(Medium).jpg

72.08 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_2011820205335_IMGP5026%20(Medium).jpg

50 KB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put it on a pole barn I owned; it lasted about 20 years. It's a cheap and quick 20 year barn roof.

I think it would be crap for a residence; the nails leak.

It was also called Onduline.

Could you use metal roofing screws instead? You know, the ones with the built-in cup washers & neoprene seals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could you use metal roofing screws instead? You know, the ones with the built-in cup washers & neoprene seals.

Yeah, those metal roofing screws are a lot better. That's what I used for repairs after I started getting a few leaks around some of the nails.

The only reason I used it was I was able to cover a 28'x28' pole barn with $180 in material and a day putting it on. Like I said, it's cheap and quick, and it worked OK for it's intended purpose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This home was built in 1980 although I am fairly certain this roof covering has been added after that. It seems to be a fiberglass type material? Anyway, first time for me . Can anyone advise me as to the material type so I can research it a bit.

Thanks.

It's not fiberglass, but bitumen saturated paper pulp. The same material and process as Orangeburg pipe. I have seen enough issues with it to be quite comfortable telling folks it's a below agricultural-building grade roof covering. I don't know of any quality building supply yards that will stock it. It's in the home centers though, for cheap-ass DIYers.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't agree with my fellows. Yes it was/is inexpensive but not easy to properly install. Temps made a great deal of difference. Do not install it on a cool morning in the summer, it will rack and squirm all over the place. Do not walk on it. It will break or crack. It is slicker than metal when damp.

I used it on several houses back in the 80's. It is pleasing to look at and very quiet. Rustic. Easy to cut and fit. I used screws on one roof and nailed all the others. Well, I didn't really do anything other than watch, drink coffee and tell stories about building the Maginot Line.

I would not use it again. The roofs are still functional, but all have swollen sections of material.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I posted the above without reading all the replies. It looks like I just called Kurt a cheap-ass DIYer.

Hell yes I'm a cheap ass DIYer. No offense taken.

I disagree on the quality. It worked OK on that old pole barn. 20 years for $180 and about 6 man hours. It looked OK. You can walk on it if you keep your steps to where the fasteners are.

I wouldn't put it on anything other than rough agricultural buildings, but it worked OK for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...