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Soldered gas line


Robert E Lee
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Observed this "tee" on a propane gas line at one of today's inspections, sure looks like a soldered joint to me. I know gas lines are supposed to be welded or brazed, what are the ramifications of a soldered fitting?

The solder joint is more likely to leak than a brazed joint. Otherwise, I don't know of any ramifications.

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Brazing and soldering are different processes. One combines metal and the other provides a seal between metals. I am sure there is a paper out there that discusses the positives of mechanical fastening (thread and socket, flare, compression, etc) versus solder and braze. Maybe expansion and contraction, transmission movements etc are considerations. Don't have the code reference nor the aga reference with me on the road today.

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G2414.10.2 (403.10.2) Tubing joints. Tubing joints shall be made with approved gas tubing fittings or be brazed with a material having a melting point in excess of 1,000ºF (538ºC) or made with press-connect fittings complying with ANSI LC-4. Brazing alloys shall not contain more than 0.05-percent phosphorus.

Doesn't say why. Joints that melt at low temperatures could be it though.

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G2414.10.2 (403.10.2) Tubing joints. Tubing joints shall be made with approved gas tubing fittings or be brazed with a material having a melting point in excess of 1,000ºF (538ºC) or made with press-connect fittings complying with ANSI LC-4. Brazing alloys shall not contain more than 0.05-percent phosphorus.

Doesn't say why. Joints that melt at low temperatures could be it though.

Brazing is simply stronger than soldering, so less likely to be knocked apart, what Jim said.

For example, when I was a kid, I brought my bike to the local shop for a frame repair, and the old guy brazed it with an acetylene torch and a brass rod. We would have laughed if he'd just soldered it.

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Brazing and soldering are different processes. One combines metal and the other provides a seal between metals.

I'm not sure what you mean, Les. Brazing and soldering create the same type of connection but use different connectors. Brazing "sticks" the rod to the object through capillary action just as soldering sticks the rod or fills a gap. When one brazes no metals are combined like they are in a welded joint.

FTR, most brazing rods are alloys of copper and zinc, not brass.

The connections produced through brazing are frequently stronger than the brazed material and compared to a soldered joint, the fire resistance is undeniable.

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Brazing and soldering are different processes. One combines metal and the other provides a seal between metals.

I'm not sure what you mean, Les. Brazing and soldering create the same type of connection but use different connectors. Brazing "sticks" the rod to the object through capillary action just as soldering sticks the rod or fills a gap. When one brazes no metals are combined like they are in a welded joint.

FTR, most brazing rods are alloys of copper and zinc, not brass.

The connections produced through brazing are frequently stronger than the brazed material and compared to a soldered joint, the fire resistance is undeniable.

Chad, you made me go and learn something!

I mostly agree with your general statement, but now learn there are definitive terms for brazing and soldering. I generally think of brazing as braze welding and not braze soldering, as in hvac. Maybe it was my "farm" background. We often fixed a part on farm machinery by brazing; could be done in the field away from electricity. We were, as I now learn, actually braze welding!

I was fully aware of the temps, but not the definitive temps for terminology. I hate to learn in a public forum!

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I have never, ever seen a soldered gas line. I've been operating under a folklore for the last 30 years that doesn't allow soldered gas lines. I have no basis for that lore other than everyone I know believes it.

I think we are basing our ignorance in the idea that someone might put a torch on it.

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I have never, ever seen a soldered gas line. I've been operating under a folklore for the last 30 years that doesn't allow soldered gas lines. I have no basis for that lore other than everyone I know believes it.

I think we are basing our ignorance in the idea that someone might put a torch on it.

This copper gas line is just glued together with paint. [:)]

I have pics of unpainted pipe joints, but they are buried. We see lots of soft copper gas lines, steel is usually a short trunk off the meter.

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tn_201199113036_NGpipe.jpg

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