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Is there such a beast?


randynavarro
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As in a piece of hardware that makes this connection properly?

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Randy, if your talking about the connection between the #2? wire & the #10? wire. No. and if there was, it wouldn't be that big. I'm guessing that is the compression connectors that get used to connect a service drop to the SEC at the weatherhead. Like a split bolt only fancier.

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I'm going to disagree. I think a split bolt (which it looks like) is exactly what you want for that. For example, look at the tech specs for this one...

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/THOMAS ... Pid=search

It listed for up to 2/0 max main with a minimum 14 tap. Others are similar, but with differing size mains and taps. In other words, they all (most at least) seem to be listed to mix conductor sizes.

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As in a piece of hardware that makes this connection properly?

Well, I was going to say that I didn't know of a split bolt that had such a wide range, but Richard found one.

There might also be a Polaris connector that could accommodate such a range.

I don't see the tape as a problem. It's a pretty standard way of insulating split bolt connectors.

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Thank you so far. . .it looks like that T&B connector from Grainger is the same shape as the one in my photo.

I'm still having trouble wrapping my mind around if this alteration is correct or not. They converted #4 wire which used to power an electric furnace to this small load center to supply two 120v circuits.

Here's a pic of the panel box and the label.

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That #12 jumper on the main lugs is not ok and the feeder should be a 4-wire, so should this box have just supplied one 120v circuit only?

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See, I told ya, didn't take long...

Three questions;

1) What is the panel feeding now?

2) What is that red #4 wire doing (looks like it's just capped)?

3) What is the overcurrent protection on that #4 cable?

By the code book, the main lugs don't look like they are listed for two wires (jumper), & if somebody that doesn't know better comes in later and modifies this to try & install a multi-wire circuit, the grounded conductor would be overloaded. Main concern.. the #4 wire is Aluminum, the tap wire is Copper. I have to wonder if the split bolt is listed for different metals at the same time? The one Richard posted is Bronze Alloy, but the specs are kinda sparse. Not making a habit of doing things in such convoluted ways, I'm really not sure either, but it looks justifiable to say, have an electrician take a closer look. Just tell 'em it has a little too much "Redneck chic" for your comfort level. Doesn't look like a clear and present hazard, but I doubt it's up to the full letter of the law either.

Electrically, if the overcurrent protection is acceptable for the smaller wire, everything should work as intended.

Don't know why they didn't just feed the panel from the #4 cable, the lugs are listed for it, it's a 3 wire w/ground cable. Lazy bastards.

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See, I told ya, didn't take long...

Three questions;

1) What is the panel feeding now?

Humidifier, condensate pump, electronic air filter, UV light for the HVAC system.

2) What is that red #4 wire doing (looks like it's just capped)?

It's the red wire that quickly becomes wrapped with white tape (not visible in the pic) that is acting as the neutral

3) What is the overcurrent protection on that #4 cable?

30 amp breaker at the main load center. That 30 amp breaker does not allow a #4 conductor so that's wrong from the beginning.

By the code book, the main lugs don't look like they are listed for two wires (jumper),The panel label says they're only rated for single conductors & if somebody that doesn't know better comes in later and modifies this to try & install a multi-wire circuit, the grounded conductor would be overloaded. Main concern.. the #4 wire is Aluminum, the tap wire is Copper. I have to wonder if the split bolt is listed for different metals at the same time? Good point-I hadn't thought of that.The one Richard posted is Bronze Alloy, but the specs are kinda sparse. Not making a habit of doing things in such convoluted ways, I'm really not sure either, but it looks justifiable to say, have an electrician take a closer look. Just tell 'em it has a little too much "Redneck chic" for your comfort level. Doesn't look like a clear and present hazard, but I doubt it's up to the full letter of the law either.

Electrically, if the overcurrent protection is acceptable for the smaller wire, everything should work as intended.Another good point. It's not. 30 amp at the main panel is too big for the #12.

Don't know why they didn't just feed the panel from the #4 cable, the lugs are listed for it, it's a 3 wire w/ground cable.Actually no. The gray feeder is one of the wires originally used for an electric furnace--it's only 2-wire with ground. Lazy bastards.

Thanks, Kyle. I've done the report and sent it off. Enjoy the holiday weekend!

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