Jump to content

Yet another furnace age question, Old Airco


Recommended Posts

Two posts about an 1975 Airco AH-130 furnace in Edmonton - first in Nov 2019 and now Feb 2020. The second sounds like an AI re-write of the first:

Quote

I've asked a couple places for a quote to replace the heat exchanger, and am told that parts aren't available.

Quote

I've approached a few spots for a statement to supplant the warmth exchanger, and am informed that parts aren't accessible.

 

 

"Ramona's" other post is another re-write, this time of a Bill Kibbel post in Plumbing....

On 3/7/2019 at 4:27 PM, Bill Kibbel said:

Approved flex couplings used underground meet a specific ASTM standard to withstand earth loads/shear.  The only one I'm familiar with is shielded (a stainless steel  band) and has molded-in bushings.

 

9 hours ago, Ramona R. Stults said:

Endorsed flex couplings utilized underground satisfy a particular ASTM guideline to withstand earth loads/shear. The just one I know about is protected (a tempered steel band) and has formed in bushings.

WHY??

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 83
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I don't see any need to change the size of the pulley, provided that the RPMs of old and new motors are the same. The smaller pulley for the higher horsepower is likely to take advantage of the extra

42 minutes ago, ejager said:

Two posts about an 1975 Airco AH-130 furnace in Edmonton - first in Nov 2019 and now Feb 2020. The second sounds like an AI re-write of the first:

"Ramona's" other post is another re-write, this time of a Bill Kibbel post in Plumbing....

WHY??

Yes, exactly. They read as if they've been fed back & forth through a translation program. "Ramona's" IP address is in Delhi. Perhaps someone in India is testing a new AI home inspector. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...

This site is great - so much great information. I too would love to find out the age of the Airco furnace at my mom's place. The Model # is AH-75MD and the Serial # is DU2 - 1185. It seems to be functioning fine still but would really appreciate finding out the age.

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Flapacor said:

This site is great - so much great information. I too would love to find out the age of the Airco furnace at my mom's place. The Model # is AH-75MD and the Serial # is DU2 - 1185. It seems to be functioning fine still but would really appreciate finding out the age.

Thanks

I find it really cool how this forum thread is still going, I just came across it looking to decide if it's worth investing in a new furnace to replace my old ACF-90MD (May 1988, 90k counterflow)

Yours would be November 1985, based on the serial number. I understand the AH-75 to be an Airco Highboy 75k BTU from what I read on here. I'm not sure what the MD stands for

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I have an old Airco ACF-90MD on floor slab, made in Aug 1986 & still going strong, only used in cold weather due to having a heat pump, so no incentive to replace it. At 85 it may outlast me. To save money Heat Pump inverted V HEX was installed above furnace so 15 x 20 duct space up to return air header is partially filled by it. 2 (different) filters were a pain to source and install so I have put blanket filter material across return registers. I want to try to widen 15 x 20 duct and install a MERV 11 20 x 20 due to allergies.

Comments anyone?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Any heating contractor can fix you up with a filter housing. I'd recommend a 20x20x4 box filter for the added area and lower static pressure. 

If you get into the habit of eating Kimchee every day, it'll help with your allergies and it might even help you to outlast the Airco. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I also have an older Airco Model ACF-130, and cannot get the standard filters, so instead buy a larger filter at Home Depot and cut it down, fiberglass easy to cut, and replace the cardboard end caps with a bit of tape to hold in place. The fiberglass is not terribly effective anyway. I am in process of replacing the blower motor, and new motor is 1/3 hp, versus 1/4 hp of original motor. My question is whether I should change the size of the motor pulley or not? The furnace has an information sheet on the front, saying the furnace pulley ratio is: 3.25 x 7 for 1/4 hp, and 3.25 x 5 for 1/3 hp. The fan pulley is 7". What does the "pulley ratio" calculation suggest(?), to those familiar with their terms?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see any need to change the size of the pulley, provided that the RPMs of old and new motors are the same. The smaller pulley for the higher horsepower is likely to take advantage of the extra horsepower by increasing the blower speed.  I wouldn't go there.

Make sure the 'frame size' and shaft diameter are the same for the new motor.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...