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New Inspector, Tools needed


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Extech has some nice, simple, cheap tools for HI work. They're a good value.

https://www.inspectorsjournal.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15393&SearchTerms=clamp,meter

We kicked this around and Bob Kenney pointed out that the clamp meter needs to read leakage current to be useful. Good point, I thought.

What leakage will you need to measure in the context of a home inspection?

I would like to read current on a grounding conductor or a plumbing pipe. For that, the meter needs to go down to 0.09 amps or so.

Not needed, but just something I would like to have when I decide to buy a better clamp meter. See this recent thread for example. https://www.inspectorsjournal.com/forum ... C_ID=16613

Douglas Hansen's post #9.

Garet's pics post #11.

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Extech has some nice, simple, cheap tools for HI work. They're a good value.

https://www.inspectorsjournal.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15393&SearchTerms=clamp,meter

We kicked this around and Bob Kenney pointed out that the clamp meter needs to read leakage current to be useful. Good point, I thought.

What leakage will you need to measure in the context of a home inspection?

I would like to read current on a grounding conductor or a plumbing pipe. For that, the meter needs to go down to 0.09 amps or so.

Not needed, but just something I would like to have when I decide to buy a better clamp meter. See this recent thread for example. https://www.inspectorsjournal.com/forum ... C_ID=16613

Douglas Hansen's post #9.

Garet's pics post #11.

OK, agreed. I just thought that you & Bob were saying it "needed" to read leakage current.

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The guys have listed most of what I use; but I carry in with me a side tool pouch with a Stinger flashlight, pen, shutoff tags, 8' tape measure, outlet tester (w/GFCI), level, temp sensor (pen type), utility knife, voltage sniffer, screwdriver. laser pointer, dust mask and of course a camera (I actually get all of it in a small pouch). I also carry a tool bag in with me containing a small tarp, shoe covers, spare batteries, extra camera, extra flashlight, binoculars, 25' tape measure, water bottle and my paperwork/leave behind stuff. In the van, my ladders, raincoat, and a small toolbox behind the seat with odds and ends including tyvek suit, masks, gloves, toilet paper and spare light bulbs. I also have a hard hat for nasty crawls.

It may seem like a lot, but my tool bag usually stays by the front door.

My worksheet has a checkout section where I account for all of my tools before I lock the door. -Hope this helps you out.

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Just bought a new tool yesterday. A Parrot AR Drone 2.0. It's for roofs that are too steep or high for me to mount. 165' max elevation and 200' range. Works off of my android phone. It's in the box till I've time to break it out and learn to use it. I'll post a video.

Yeah, I'll probably play with it in between jobs.

Marc

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A demonstration in the store took some nice photos but the biggest factor in pic quality is the stability of the craft outdoors. I've ten days to try it out and return it if the pics are no good. I'll begin learning how to fly it today then do a battery of tests.

Marc

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