Jump to content

Recommended Posts

If the siding does need protection for current potential, shouldn't it be bonded to the GEC instead of having its own ground rod?

Also, that looks like a hollow pipe rather than a listed grounding electrode.

It is done for lighting. To take it to the ground

Link to post
Share on other sites

If the siding does need protection for current potential, shouldn't it be bonded to the GEC instead of having its own ground rod?

Also, that looks like a hollow pipe rather than a listed grounding electrode.

It is done for lighting. To take it to the ground

I understand that lightning can be a source of electrical current in the siding. My point is, to equalize potential and reduce arching between the siding and other metal components in the house, the goal would be to "bond" the siding to the GEC (grounding electrode conductor). Many times this is done by connecting at the service equipment. It equalizes potential between the different metal components and reduces the likelihood of arching which could start fires.

I don't believe that bonding aluminum siding is even required by NEC but if the goal is to reduce lightning hazards, it should be bonded to the GEC. It's ok for it to have its own grounding rod but it should not be independent of the other grounded systems.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a full variety of broken/incomplete ones. Once on a new tract house doing a final for the AHJ, I told the site super he needed to cut the ladder to fit the floor. Just happened his "punch out" man was there with a battery powered skilsaw. He snatched up the folded leg and started to whack it off at random when I stopped him and said, "Let me show you, bro, how that is done". He had not a clue, but he did have a brand new truck outside.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Let me show you, bro, how that is done".

Sounds like it involves MATH! Ugghh!

No. I just put a 2X4 or 1X4 on the floor next to the leg I want to cut, mark it with a pencil then cut. Might have to do it several times. Learned it from my grandfather.

What's your method Jim B?

Marc

Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you suppose the current rating is on an aluminum gutter rivet?

I don't know, but I know from experience that it's well below 160 amps.

I'd wager it's about as effective as tires on the roof of an aluminum clad mobile home. Someone needs a prozac.

Any talk of bonding aluminum siding should begin with bonding *each piece* together.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...