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I used to describe bathrooms in my reports as to whether the tub or shower wall was ceramic or fiberglass, or whether the floor was ceramic or vinyl or whatnot, but stopped doing that a couple of years ago. I feel it is needless energy on my part.

I state the location of every bathroom but if there are no issues with the bathrooms I merely write satisfactory and nothing else.

I'm considering adding some fluff pictures to my bathroom section merely to show what the bathroom looks like. Maybe my clients will appreciate it?

I might also do that with kitchens.

I have gotten into the habit of taking at least two pictures of every room I go into from two opposite corners and even pictures of the closet interiors if I think about it. When I walk into a basement I start by going to all four corners and shooting wide-angle shots. I'm taking a minimum of 150 pics per inspection.

I don't want to get crazy with photos of things that don't mean anything (I always have a picture of the exterior front on my cover page) other than maybe the bathrooms, and maybe the kitchen. Thoughts?

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I'm big on pictures. If it was done in the right way to "describe" the bathroom, why not?

I asked this question, in a different form, over @ the ASHI forum a few years ago. Everyone thought a description was a narrative driven operation.

Personally, I'd never do it. It's easier to have it in drop down menus, i.e.

MBR / tile floor, shower

2nd fl. bath / tile floor, fiberglass tub surround

etc., etc.....

The only reason I do it at all is I seem to remember Illinois requires a description of bathrooms, so I put it in the matrix when I was building my report system.

I should check the Illinois SOP again...maybe it's changed.

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That idea goes against one of the tenets I use to determine what enters a report. It rhymes with reports that are filled with oft-repeated mentions like inspected, satisfactory, etc. I don't do it unless required by an SOP.

Marc

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That idea goes against one of the tenets I use to determine what enters a report. It rhymes with reports that are filled with oft-repeated mentions like inspected, satisfactory, etc. I don't do it unless required by an SOP.

Marc

What do you mean?

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That idea goes against one of the tenets I use to determine what enters a report. It rhymes with reports that are filled with oft-repeated mentions like inspected, satisfactory, etc. I don't do it unless required by an SOP.

Marc

What do you mean?

No fluff in the report, whether copy or photos, unless required by an SOP.

Marc

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I just checked and you do not have to describe walls and floors in the bathroom, however, we are supposed to describe in detail the fixtures and faucets. Hmm...

Yes, that particular element has been universally ignored by every home inspector I know since it's inception in 2003.

Wait, I think Bellefontaine worked it into his report system in some way; it was a selling point...."we're the only one with a State compliant report system!".

I don't plan on doing it. My fall back position is "hey, it's a full bath meaning there's sinks, tubs, and a toilet, or a half bath meaning sink and toilet". That's enough a description AFAIC.

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I limit interior descriptions to what covers the floors, types of cabinetry and countertops, types of doors, types of wall and ceiling coverings and types of windows. I don't describe individual rooms other than to remark about the number of kitchens, bathrooms and bedrooms.

Unless something is wrong in a room, nobody really cares. If something wrong in a particular room fits in the plumbing, hvac, or electrical section, that's where the comment about the issue goes. The only thing I put in the interior section is interior-related stuff that's more than fair wear and tear - missing doors, doors falling off their hinges, plaster delaminating or keyway failure, drywall falling down, cabinets falling off the wall or destroyed, etc..

Never comment about carpet condition. Don't care. Why would I waste space in a report to document something that's self evident and doesn't require a home inspector to investigate in order to know what's going on there?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Unless something is wrong in a room, nobody really cares. If something wrong in a particular room fits in the plumbing, hvac, or electrical section, that's where the comment about the issue goes. The only thing I put in the interior section is interior-related stuff that's more than fair wear and tear - missing doors, doors falling off their hinges, plaster delaminating or keyway failure, drywall falling down, cabinets falling off the wall or destroyed, etc..

Never comment about carpet condition. Don't care. Why would I waste space in a report to document something that's self evident and doesn't require a home inspector to investigate in order to know what's going on there?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

That's my approach. Why talk about what's not there?

If carpet is especially nasty, I do put that in with a picture of the monster stain.

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I am required to inspect a lot of stuff, and usually there is nothing to report about those things, cabinets, walls, ceilings, flooring, it's all good. I put some interior pictures in my report, see? I inspected it. It reduces a lot of text that way.

Every bathroom gets a pic of the fixtures, and maybe a couple of under the sink shots. Then a defect pic or two goes in there. Call it fluff or glamor if you like. Bathroom and kitchen are high priority to a lot of people.

They can be sitting back at home thinking, was there tiles on the backsplash or was that the other place? I maybe didn't mention the tiles, but there's a picture in the report.

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.........

Never comment about carpet condition. Don't care. Why would I waste space in a report to document something that's self evident and doesn't require a home inspector to investigate in order to know what's going on there?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Does that go for anything that's self-evident? How about a broken window or tile falling off the wall at a tub surround? They're certainly self-evident.

I know the process is different in your area, but here, a buyer can't have an inspection done before they enter into an Agreement of Sale (and put down a hefty deposit). Everything goes into the report, self-evident or not. The buyer may need it in the report in order to negotiate.

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Yep.

The other position sounds like standard HI bluster until one does it long enough. Then it sounds not so smart.

I recall being sued twice for cosmetic stuff. It's just one of those things...do it long enough and the numbers say you will find that prick looking to shake you down. One is quickly educated in the economics and accounting of lawsuits. You pay because it's the cheaper out. All that's necessary to beat the rap are a couple words and a picture. And, the customer might just want that picture like Joe said.

So, bluster at your own risk.

Just a little advice.

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.........

Never comment about carpet condition. Don't care. Why would I waste space in a report to document something that's self evident and doesn't require a home inspector to investigate in order to know what's going on there?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Does that go for anything that's self-evident? How about a broken window or tile falling off the wall at a tub surround? They're certainly self-evident.

I know the process is different in your area, but here, a buyer can't have an inspection done before they enter into an Agreement of Sale (and put down a hefty deposit). Everything goes into the report, self-evident or not. The buyer may need it in the report in order to negotiate.

It's pretty simple. The buyer knew the carpet was nasty when he/she made an offer. The seller knew it when putting it on the market. They didn't need to hire me to tell them about it.

A broken window is not interior - it's part of the exterior envelope. That goes in the exterior section.

Tiles falling off would be mentioned; but only because it you've got tiles falling off you've probably got something else going on behind the tile that the client needs to know about. That's stuff they need to know. I've had clients say, "We already know that we need to redo the tub surround, so you don't have to report that," and I ended up explaining to them that there was probably more going on behind that bad tile than just loose tiles that they needed to know about.

Bottom line, they hire us to tell them about stuff they probably don't have the ability or experience to figure out on their own. Yeah, they need to compile a list for themselves for negotiation but where in your SOP does it say that you are responsible for making sure they include every nicklel and dime thing they can dream up to negotiate? Answer - nowhere. I'll even bet there's something in there that says the inspection is not intended to be a tool for negotiation.

Inspect and report on stuff that's necessary to be inspected and reported about - not needless stuff that's just adding bulk to the report.

Just my opinion - worth the price charged.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I put a picture of the kitchen in my kitchen section, a picture of the living room in my interior section, and pictures of the bathrooms in the bathroom section even if there is nothing to report. I take at least one picture of every room when I enter it, even if I don't use it in the report. Never know when you might need supporting documentation.

As for the rest of the report, if I see it, I take a picture and put it in the report. I let the client decide what he considers important. Makes for some longer reports, but my clients are always happy, happy, happy.

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I've got all descriptions in a 'Descriptions' section.

Marc

Me too. Why mix it up?

(Because that's the way report software vendors designed everything. It must be a good idea for people that don't know anything about home inspections designing the report systems because everyone uses them.)

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I put plenty of "fluff" pictures in the report.

Pictures of the exterior, roof, interior, equipment, kitchen, bathrooms etc.

Just looked at one recent report. Had about 30 "fluff" pictures in it like the ones below of the bathrooms and kitchen.

I take the pictures more for my notes than anything else but they also help show conditions at the time of inspection and I've been thanked many times for having them in the report, usually by the wives who don't remember what something or other looked like.

Takes me all of about a minute total (2 or 3 seconds a picture) to slide those 30 pictures into the report as I review the film strip to write the report. Grab it, drag it, move on down the film strip. HomeGauge makes it easy.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201336234813_Fluff.jpg

18.58?KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201336235356_Kitchen%20Fluff.jpg

22.75?KB

To each, their own.

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