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Well,

Like Bill said, it's supposed to support a 200 pound man. Sit on that bar and see what happens. Just make sure you strap a cushion to your bum 'cuz you're gonna end up sitting on the ground when it pivots and lets loose.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Well,

Like Bill said, it's supposed to support a 200 pound man. Sit on that bar and see what happens. Just make sure you strap a cushion to your bum 'cuz you're gonna end up sitting on the ground when it pivots and lets loose.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Exactly. The handrail itself is the safety issue. If it were not there, no issue. BTW, I believe the 200 lb force is a lateral force pushing against the side of the rail, not sitting on top of it.

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Your government paid lots of money for that! They have paid for hundreds more, just like it. I have personally seen hundreds and have never seen a compliant one. Report it to who? My Senator? My Congressman?

Just as stupid as the new regulation to duct tape all tears and holes in floor coverings. $30 per tear or hole. Was in a house the other day where there was more duct tape than carpet!

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Yes, I thought guardrails were supposed to withstand 200 lb. loads in any direction.

Not only that, but the MA code (based until recently on the BOCA code) didn't used to require a handrail on a set of stairs that was X risers high.

Ours only ever required guardrails on stairs that were X inches from the ground. Probably because riser heights can vary so much.

Is that just me? Or does anyone have a quote saying different?

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Were was there a battle?

The appraiser is there to valuate the property as it compares to the market area. The 2x4s don't add value at most it will loose a little on appearance. The appraiser isn't there to evaluate or apply building codes.

Granted it does not meet code structurally. Not needed per code in the first place. So unbolt it and problem solved. Probably was added as a quick fix for a family member that had problems with steps and needed a little something to steady themselves.

If you were to fall the 2x4 wouldn't add much to the injury claim.

Oh by the way, the snow on the walk and step is more of a hazard than the 2x4.

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Garry,

the appraiser is ther to view and see if "code" is applied. That is the new wrinkle in their job. They are in complete control of application of HUD standards. They are asked to make judgements they are not always qualified to make.

This hand rail and hundreds (thousands) have been installed per HUD, Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac instruction. It really had nothing to do with codes or requirements, only that an appraiser will note a hand rail was in place and life goes on! Every repo house(in Michigan) that has a HUD interest has had these needed and necessary handrails installed, carpet taped, etc.

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Yes, I thought guardrails were supposed to withstand 200 lb. loads in any direction.

Not only that, but the MA code (based until recently on the BOCA code) didn't used to require a handrail on a set of stairs that was X risers high.

Ours only ever required guardrails on stairs that were X inches from the ground. Probably because riser heights can vary so much.

Is that just me? Or does anyone have a quote saying different?

I read an article in Smithsonian Magazine years ago about the history of stairs and how they started as notched logs placed on an angle against the side of a building. In the article it mentioned that a human while walking up a set of steps will look down and check their footing at the third and twelfth or thirteenth step (not sure about the 12-13 exactly), maybe that's where the riser requirement comes from. Think about it the next time you walk a set of stairs.

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Yes, I thought guardrails were supposed to withstand 200 lb. loads in any direction.

Not only that, but the MA code (based until recently on the BOCA code) didn't used to require a handrail on a set of stairs that was X risers high.

Ours only ever required guardrails on stairs that were X inches from the ground. Probably because riser heights can vary so much.

Is that just me? Or does anyone have a quote saying different?

I read an article in Smithsonian Magazine years ago about the history of stairs and how they started as notched logs placed on an angle against the side of a building. In the article it mentioned that a human while walking up a set of steps will look down and check their footing at the third and twelfth or thirteenth step (not sure about the 12-13 exactly), maybe that's where the riser requirement comes from. Think about it the next time you walk a set of stairs.

I'll have to look that one up - any idea how long ago it was?

If you're really interested in stairways, you should get copies of Jon Templer's two volume set, "The Staircase, History and Theories," and, "The Staircase, Studies of Hazards, Falls, and Safer Design."

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Garry,

the appraiser is ther to view and see if "code" is applied. That is the new wrinkle in their job. They are in complete control of application of HUD standards. They are asked to make judgements they are not always qualified to make.

That's why I said to report them to the licensing bodies. HUD and FHA will continue to push their dumb agendas until they get pushed back. If appraisers are getting spanked for practicing outside of their field they will push for a change in HUD policy, or stop filling out the forms.

Worked for the licensing fuss over 203k guys.

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Yes, I thought guardrails were supposed to withstand 200 lb. loads in any direction.

Not only that, but the MA code (based until recently on the BOCA code) didn't used to require a handrail on a set of stairs that was X risers high.

Ours only ever required guardrails on stairs that were X inches from the ground. Probably because riser heights can vary so much.

Is that just me? Or does anyone have a quote saying different?

I read an article in Smithsonian Magazine years ago about the history of stairs and how they started as notched logs placed on an angle against the side of a building. In the article it mentioned that a human while walking up a set of steps will look down and check their footing at the third and twelfth or thirteenth step (not sure about the 12-13 exactly), maybe that's where the riser requirement comes from. Think about it the next time you walk a set of stairs.

I'll have to look that one up - any idea how long ago it was?

If you're really interested in stairways, you should get copies of Jon Templer's two volume set, "The Staircase, History and Theories," and, "The Staircase, Studies of Hazards, Falls, and Safer Design."

Too many to remember,over 10.

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