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Master bedroom panel


BADAIR
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Excellent point! If all outlets in the bedroom have to be AFCI protected by current code, what about the panel. Could it be an ignition source? Inquiring minds want to know?

I generally don't worry about panels in bedrooms in older construction. No AFCI's there anyway.

Edit...Mike responded while I was typing. Still an excellent question.

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Hi,

My understanding of the AFCI issue is that they are designed to detect arc faults downstream from the panel in places hidden from view and mostly not easily accessible - switch boxes, receptacles, junction boxes, etc. I was taught that the panel itself is supposed to function as a large containment center, so that if there is an issue, such as a fire, in the panel it will be safely contained behind the deadfront cover. That's why having proper grommets and strain relief and intact knockouts are so critical at the panel.

Once again, electricity is not my strong suit and I know that Jim will set me straight if I've got this too skewed.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by BADAIR

If the electric panel is located in the Master bedroom does it have to, or should it be AFCI protected like other bedroom circuits?

Badair

No, it needn't.

210.12(B) Dwelling Unit Bedrooms. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit bedrooms shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination type installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.

A panel is not an "outlet."

Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which power is taken to supply utilization equipment.

- Auntie Jim Katen, Oregon

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My take was that the AFCI system of protection was pointed toward bedroom circuits/outlets due to the higher likelihood that lamp cords and extension cords would be mechanically damaged in bedrooms due to furniture and so forth. The surveys of how fires started pointed to bedrooms and these types of stranded-copper cords being damaged over time, arcing and causing ignition of combustibles. (Sheets, drapes, clothes).

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Originally posted by Rob Amaral

My take was that the AFCI system of protection was pointed toward bedroom circuits/outlets due to the higher likelihood that lamp cords and extension cords would be mechanically damaged in bedrooms due to furniture and so forth. The surveys of how fires started pointed to bedrooms and these types of stranded-copper cords being damaged over time, arcing and causing ignition of combustibles. (Sheets, drapes, clothes).

That was what was explained to me also, although the emphasis was more on the number of extension cords in BR's & not so much the inherent greater likelihood of damage.

Who knows?

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