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I am converting a small bedroom to a full bath on the second floor of my 1889 home. It will contain two sinks, a toilet, shwer and separate tub. I am in the process of running the 3" PVC waste line down to the basement through an open wall. I then have to run it laterally to the center of the basement. I hope I have no problems with this run.

I have several questions...

1. What advice is there for running this waste pipe. Waste water with have a 10 foot drop then have to go lateral for about twenty feet. I realize I need the slop...what about washouts?

2. I will run service lines (hot and cold) through the same chase. Should they be 3/4 inch or 1/2 inch? I was thinking 3/4inch to the room and then disperse with 1/2 inch.

3. The home has three stand alone water heaters in the basement (formally the house was carved into three apartments). I have since returned the home to one family. I have a 50 gallon gas water heater that takes care of the first floor with no problem (kitchen, wet bar, 2 washing machines, and 1/2 bath). One 25 gallon electric water heater services a three quarter bath on the second floor (three boys). The other 25 gallon electric heater services a second three quarter bath on the second floor (one girl). As I outfit this new master bath I am concerned about supply and demand as well as distance. I am thinking that I will pull from the one water heater that is only servicing my one daughter's bathroom. I have no knowledge on how effective service will be over distance. Can anyone comment?

4. Within th new bath I have more than 12 inches of underfloor space but the rafters run the 'wrong way', 16 inches on center. What is the best way to route PVC through these rafters?

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Since you are planning lateral for 20 feet, go lateral between the second floor joists and then down that wall. I don't advise cutting joists at all if possible.

Use the correct fittings that have a sweep rather than a sharp bend. Buy a Homeowner's Plumbing book from the comic book rack at the big box store. Remember to install vents.

A family of 5 in my world can get by with one 50 gal heater, but I suppose it depends on the # of mins in the shower. I think you'll be fine with either the less used 25 or the 50.

Sure 3/4 is better than 1/2.

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There's an enormous distance to journey from being stumped about siting clean-outs and knowing how to plumb a house. Far too much to bridge over an internet forum.

Besides, we're mostly home inspectors, not plumbers and not all of us are familiar with the Ohio codes.

Not trying to be negative, just cautious.

Marc

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I am converting a small bedroom to a full bath on the second floor of my 1889 home. It will contain two sinks, a toilet, shwer and separate tub. I am in the process of running the 3" PVC waste line down to the basement through an open wall. I then have to run it laterally to the center of the basement. I hope I have no problems with this run.

I have several questions...

1. What advice is there for running this waste pipe. Waste water with have a 10 foot drop then have to go lateral for about twenty feet. I realize I need the slop...what about washouts?

First, do yourself a favor and use cast iron for the vertical portion from the second floor to the basement. It will be much, much quieter. At the bottom of the drop, use a combo wye and put a cleanout at the unused end.

2. I will run service lines (hot and cold) through the same chase. Should they be 3/4 inch or 1/2 inch? I was thinking 3/4inch to the room and then disperse with 1/2 inch.

You could use either one. If you have nice high water pressure and you use 1/2", it will take much less time for hot water to reach the bathroom. If you use 3/4", you will have better flow, which could be critical if your water pressure is low.

3. The home has three stand alone water heaters in the basement (formally the house was carved into three apartments). I have since returned the home to one family. I have a 50 gallon gas water heater that takes care of the first floor with no problem (kitchen, wet bar, 2 washing machines, and 1/2 bath). One 25 gallon electric water heater services a three quarter bath on the second floor (three boys). The other 25 gallon electric heater services a second three quarter bath on the second floor (one girl). As I outfit this new master bath I am concerned about supply and demand as well as distance. I am thinking that I will pull from the one water heater that is only servicing my one daughter's bathroom. I have no knowledge on how effective service will be over distance. Can anyone comment?

A 25 gallon electric water heater is one step up from a teakettle. Bring water from the 50-gallon gas water heater to the new master bath.

4. Within th new bath I have more than 12 inches of underfloor space but the rafters run the 'wrong way', 16 inches on center. What is the best way to route PVC through these rafters?

Very carefully.

Seriously, I'd have to see the layout. Just remember, couplings are your friends.

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Install a passive loop so hot water gently circulates; you won't have to wait for hot water.

Insulate the pipes. Don't just use sections of snap on insulation; but miters for all turns and tee's, and install insulation meticulously, don't leave any exposed sections of pipe.

You will be amazed what nicely installed insulation will do. Sloppily installed insulation is almost like no insulation.

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