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I found these exposed connectors in the attic of a new home today. In fact, there were two other instances where the same type of connectors were just hanging out of the wall. They didn't have any brand name on them or other identifying markings for me to research them. The house had a certificate of occupancy on site so presumably the city electrical inspector passed this. Then again, it was in the attic and he may never have set foot there. But regardless of that issue I'm trying to figure out if this is allowable or if they should be boxed the same as a conventional junction with wire nuts. I am leaning towards thinking that a junction box would still be required but I don't want to misspeak. Has anybody seen these things, and should they be in a junction box?

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NM constitutes a recognized wiring method - Article 334 - and must be installed only as permitted by that method as per 300.3. The only application where single conductors are permitted is as overhead conductors, specified in 225.6.

Are those EGCs connected to those neutrals? They shouldn't be connected downstream of the main panel - 250.24(5).

Marc

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Thanks, Marc, but I'm not sure what single conductors have to do with anything. We're looking at a splice here. And yes, I know neutrals and grounds shouldn't be connected together, but if you'll notice the two neutrals share the inner two openings, (out of four) and the two grounds sure the outer two. Similarly, the two hots are connected in the two outer openings in the connector. So for all I know the inner two openings may be one connection and the outer two a separate one.

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Thanks, Marc, but I'm not sure what single conductors have to do with anything....

Once you cut the sheathing off, it's isn't NM. It's individual conductors and must be installed within the rules of any of the other wiring methods in the code. That's why sheathing can be removed only if it's inside the box.

Marc

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The responses confirm what I suspected. It's just a junction in need of a box...

Thanks guys.

So on a lighter note, here's a pic from the job with a note I added. Be sure to look at the bottom of the photo.

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Once you cut the sheathing off, it's isn't NM. It's individual conductors and must be installed within the rules of any of the other wiring methods in the code. That's why sheathing can be removed only if it's inside the box.

Marc

No, they are not individual conductors, because you cannot strip the sheathing from NM and use the conductors individually. Not and be code complaint anyway.
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And yes, I know neutrals and grounds shouldn't be connected together, but if you'll notice the two neutrals share the inner two openings, (out of four) and the two grounds sure the outer two. Similarly, the two hots are connected in the two outer openings in the connector. So for all I know the inner two openings may be one connection and the outer two a separate one.

NO WAY. I thought there was another connector hidden out of sight. You meant to tell me they have the two whites AND the two grounds in the same 4-port connector?? BIG no-no.

So then yes, that is one huge f-up. No box, and neutrals spliced with grounds.

Amazing in a new home. [:-yuck]

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