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What, if anything, is wrong with this setup?


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It was a 100 year old house that the previous owners "updated". I actually see the flex pipe quite a bit on older home remodels as the drain piping doesn't quite line up.

So here was the deal. I recommended to my client that she have the side sewer scoped due to the age. The plumber came out, and scared the crap out of her. He told her that the entire set up under the kitchen sink will need to be redone at the tune of $300 + tax. He also told her that the galvanized water lines should have been replaced(even though the small section remaining was spotless) That is why I come here to be either scolded for missing it, or, as I was hoping, justified for not calling it out.

I mentioned the tape to my client and both had a little laugh at it.

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I'd call it pretty screwed up. That horizontal pipe will always be full of water. The corrugated thingy doesn't belong there - it doesn't matter if it "doesn't line up." That's what plumbing is all about at it's heart, getting things to line up.

It should be ripped out and replaced. $300 seems a bit steep, but I'm not the one who'll be under there cursing for an hour.

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It would take a plumber maybe an hour and $30 worth of parts to re-do that.

The longer the butt-crack, the longer the job will take. It's an old joke now but worth repeating. [:)]

The horizontal section needs to be raised so it is above the trap arm. I see there is a dishwasher drain that could go onto the horizontal section. The T needs to have a downward sweep to it.

I call out galvanized water supply pipe because the insurance providers don't like it. So the premiums will cost more than replacing the pipe with copper or PEX. But again, the cost depends on who's doing the job.

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The dishwasher should not share an angle stop with the hot water line to the sink; each fixture should have its own angle stop.

The dishwasher drain appears to connect to a wye behind the left tailpiece. It should have a high loop secured to the underside of the sink lip, or should have a drainage air-gap device if your folks use the UPC.

The trap depth exceeds the 4 inch maximum that is allowable, and the corrugated material does not have a smooth interior waterway.

This sink is never going to be adaptable to a disposer with the trap arm this high, and the long-term solution is to open the wall, cut the pipe, and install a new san tee in the wall about six inches lower than it is now.

FWIW, I think the tee on the continuous waste is a directional fitting that is installed in the correct orientation.

The connection to the right drain basket looks damaged, and is likely to have to be replaced when the rest of this mess is straightened out.

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The problem is the outlet elevation; lowering the connection to the DWV will be a mess. In my market, $300 would be about right. The rest of it is $20 in parts and about 15 minutes.

Does anyone write up dual-purpose stops? I thought that's what dual stops were for; the hot water and the DW. It's wrong?

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I've never written them up but Douglas is right. The Louisiana Plumbing Code, which is an altered version of the 1994 Standard Plumbing Code, requires it:

610.3 Controls for Fixtures Within Dwellings and Dwelling Units

610.3.1 Each individual fixture shall have an accessible shutoff valve at each outlet which will permit each fixture to be shut off without interfering with the water supply to any other fixtures.

Marc

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We sometimes use double angle stops... they connect to a single stub, have two handles and two outlets.

If you were willing to forego the disposer, could this setup the somewhat improved by leaving the connection to the drain as is, and using two traps? The need to tee in the second sink makes a single trap too low.

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. . . If you were willing to forego the disposer, could this setup the somewhat improved by leaving the connection to the drain as is, and using two traps? The need to tee in the second sink makes a single trap too low.

That would work, but it looks like it wouldn't even be necessary if you got rid of the extraneous fittings and installed things the right way 'round.

It wouldn't help to forego the disposer, but it would definitely help to forgo it.

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Shorter tail pieces will fix the trap height. Changing the basin to a bowl and half will accommodate a disposer.

Your client needs to go to a big orange or blue box, buy a plumbing book and get to know the guy in the plumbing isle. It'll take several trips, but she'll have it fixed correctly long before she spends $300. If there still is a local hardware, even better.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Shorter tail pieces will fix the trap height. Changing the basin to a bowl and half will accommodate a disposer.

Your client needs to go to a big orange or blue box, buy a plumbing book and get to know the guy in the plumbing isle. It'll take several trips, but she'll have it fixed correctly long before she spends $300. If there still is a local hardware, even better.

What's a 'basin', 'bowl' and 'bowl and a half'?

How about a short school on that, if you don't mind?

Marc

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