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This is a 16-year-old roof but looks much older. Do you think some of this deterioration was caused by hail? A lot of it just looks prematurely aged.

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I don't see hail damage. At least not just hail damage. In the last photo with the heavy damage, is that in an area where it was likely that someone would set up a ladder and routinely access the roof? For Christmas lights, routine maintenance, or other reasons?

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It's probably just cheap crap shingles. I see this occasionally; they're paper thin potato chip substrates, thin bitumen, and really thin granule layer.

There's a lot of operators in Chicago using cheapest of the cheap shingles. The roofing industry in Chicago is somewhere between a shady business and a flat out con. There are some good practitioners, and they'll tell you the same thing.

There are an amazing number of operators that set up a DBA, do it for 3 years, take the tent down and move somewhere else, and start it all over again.

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Interesting. I inspected this for the owner who did not want a roofer to evaluate for obvious reasons. The doc I saw said it was roofed in 1997 with Timberline.

The areas of heavy wear were pretty consistent with southern exposure. I told her to call GAF to see if there could be some warranty. 25 yrs?

She told me she used a roof rake? to get snow off but only in areas that she could reach from the ground. If she is telling the truth that isn't the reason for all this wear.

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She told me she used a roof rake? to get snow off but only in areas that she could reach from the ground. If she is telling the truth that isn't the reason for all this wear.

That is probably true, a roof rake from the ground will only reach a few feet up. A good samaritan will usually go up on the roof to finish the job with a snow shovel. If you look at the recessed shingles from your pics, they show lot less damage except on lower edges. That would be consistant with shovel scrapings.

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I have seen this type of wear consistently here in Southern California on southern exposures. We have a temperate climate with no snow or ice. In more modest neighborhoods it is quite common to see the south side of a gable newly roofed while the north side is left alone.

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