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asbestos cement shingles


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For houses that have asbestos cement siding shingles that are intact and in good shape, do you mention it to the client, put it in the report as informational, or both?

I wrote this long winded informational boiler plate. How badly does it suck?

The house has cement based siding shingles which are likely to contain asbestos as part of their makeup. The material is intact and very durable. If it's not tampered with or broken up there should be no health concerns. If you decide to remove and discard these shingles as part of home repairs or renovations, you'll need to hire a qualified contractor who is knowledgeable of the rules and regulations with regard to disposing of asbestos cement shingles. On the day of the inspection, the shingles were in serviceable condition and not considered to be a health concern to occupants.

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For houses that have asbestos cement siding shingles that are intact and in good shape, do you mention it to the client, put it in the report as informational, or both?

I wrote this long winded informational boiler plate. How badly does it suck?

The house has cement based siding shingles which are likely to contain asbestos as part of their makeup. The material is intact and very durable. If it's not tampered with or broken up there should be no health concerns. If you decide to remove and discard these shingles as part of home repairs or renovations, you'll need to hire a qualified contractor who is knowledgeable of the rules and regulations with regard to disposing of asbestos cement shingles. On the day of the inspection, the shingles were in serviceable condition and not considered to be a health concern to occupants.

A suggestion:

The roof shingles are an old variety that likely contain asbestos fibers. As long as the shingles remain unbroken, the asbestos within them is rendered non-friable by the cement composition of the shingles and there's no hazard. If someday you decide to replace this roof covering, you'll need a contractor well-versed in the federal rules and regulations pertaining to the handling and disposition of asbestos containing materials. As far as I can determine, this roof covering is still in good condition.

Marc

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Very common here on late 18th, early 19th century homes.

Marc

18th century? As in the 1700's? Maybe I'm wrong, but of all the time I've spent in New Orleans and surrounding areas I've never seen original shingles that contained asbestos on any homes older than the early 20th century.

Fellas. You've caught me wrong twice.

It's late 19th, early 20th century.

What's come over me?

Back to John's OP.

Marc

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Around here the landfill allows you to discard up to a specific amount - I can't remember how much - of asbestos a week. They supply you with the yellow plastic bags with the red lettering on them. You remove the shingles from your house, stack them in the shed and then every week package up a batch up to the weight limit in the yellow bags and they'll pick it up and dump it in the landfill. No complicated contractor arrangements.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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The house has cement based siding shingles which are likely to contain asbestos as part of their makeup.

The cement siding shingles probably contain asbestos.

The material is intact and very durable. If it's not tampered with or broken up there should be no health concerns.

As long as they remain intact, any asbestos that's in them will stay in them and not be released into the air.

If you decide to remove and discard these shingles as part of home repairs or renovations, you'll need to hire a qualified contractor who is knowledgeable of the rules and regulations with regard to disposing of asbestos cement shingles.

If you decide to remove them, hire licensed asbestos abatement contractor to do the work and dispose of them properly.

On the day of the inspection, the shingles were in serviceable condition and not considered to be a health concern to occupants.

I found XX cracked shingles today. The rest seem to be in good shape.

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Since the composite shingles "may" or "probably" contain asbestos, I usually write to "have the shingles tested for asbestos content prior to disturbing." rather than just go to having the contractor do it. A lot of those shingles were made without asbestos. The fee for the test from an environmental testing lab is way less than paying the contractor. Charlie

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Home owners can place them at the curb for pick up here. No special bags or tags needed.

The last time I had to deal with them as a contractor I had to pay a $30 fee. I was told it was for the hazardous materials permit to transport the dumpster. That was over a decade ago.

My brother is the supervisor on a major asbestos removal project. Once the pipe insulation has been removed he is more concerned about his lead exposure than he is about any other ACMs left on the project.

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Some fresh pics here.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201391812032_siding3.jpg

53.11 KB

wadda are we supposed to be looking at? - a ratty old peach tree branch?

I'm not an arborist. I suppose it could be a peach. [:)]

Most of us are looking at the fiber cement shingles. A prior owner patched the broken corners with white silicone caulking. The house is strong as the pyramids with a fireproof skin.

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