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Time to replace Apollo tank or system?


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I have been reading all the threads about Apollo systems. I live in NC with fairly mild winters. I have an Apollo system installed in my town home from 1998 ( so 15 years old). Every time the outside temperature drops past freezing my house temperature is at least 5-10 degrees lower than the what the thermostat is set at. I call out a technician and they fix some part of the tank and I get by. Then the next winter it is struggling to keep the house warm. I am still able to get hot water for a shower for at least a few minutes.

The thermocoupler and thermostat have been replaced. Last winter the heating unit in the attic was checked and nothing was wrong with it. I replace my air filters frequently.

Now with mounting repair bills and increased heating costs I am wondering if it is not time to just replace the thing. I have read complaints about this system and wonder if the folks who have complained have replaced the unit and all is good.

Also, is a change in the system type a better idea than staying with hydro heat?

Thanks.

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Nothing wrong with Hydro-air systems as long as the source is adequate to meet demand. 15 years would seem to be an acceptable time to replace the unit but before you do have someone do a thorough heat loss calculation to properly size your replacement. You might also want to consider a small on-demand water heater to supplement your showers during very cold winters.

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Jim,

I have been disappointed with its ability to heat my town home since I have moved in 6 years ago. The last three winters it has actually struggled to keep the inside temperature in the mid 60s on really cold NC nights/days.

What is the BTU/hr rating of the water heater?

The capacity in gallons?

Is there a tempering valve above your water heater?

What temperature is the water heater set at?

Is your townhome an end unit or a middle unit?

How many square feet is the house?

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Jim,

I live in an end unit. I have more windows, but I have insulated many of them. I have a Apollo 5010 that is 40gal and 52500 btu. The town home is about 1300 sq.ft.

I have set the temperature dial to the hottest a few days ago (it was at the lowest setting) when there was a cold spell. It did ok last night and it was cooler outside. The temperature dial was replaced last year.

I don't know if there is a tempering valve or not.

Thanks!

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Jim,

I live in an end unit. I have more windows, but I have insulated many of them. I have a Apollo 5010 that is 40gal and 52500 btu. The town home is about 1300 sq.ft.

I have set the temperature dial to the hottest a few days ago (it was at the lowest setting) when there was a cold spell. It did ok last night and it was cooler outside. The temperature dial was replaced last year.

I don't know if there is a tempering valve or not.

Thanks!

Your set up sounds fine. It ought to be able to keep your house warm.

Unless the water heater is leaking, there's no reason to replace it.

You probably want to have a tempering valve. When you set the water heater to its hottest temperature, it's going to produce water in the 140 to 150 degree range. You don't want 140 degree water to come out of your showers. The tempering valve mixes a little bit of cold water with the hot water that goes to your tubs, showers, and faucets. At the same time, the straight, unadulterated hot water goes to your furnace.

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