Jump to content

19th Century General Store


Recommended Posts

Not sure I wanted to see the re-muddle, Bill. The phrase "Nostalgia ain't what it used to be" comes to mind.

I was at MOHAI (our Museum of History and Industry) on Sunday for my wife's UW Microbiology Dept Christmas brunch (don't ask). One 1919 exhibit photo in particular caught my eye. I managed to find it online. See http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm-m ... X=1&REC=10 .

I imagine my 1927 house was built using wood from a similar stack (albeit fir), but it's the height that amazes me for all sorts of reasons; wind, seismic, not to mention the logistics and safety.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. You don't realize the height of that stack until you notice the guy standing about a third of the way up. I know that people were marginally shorter then, but still...

Not sure I wanted to see the re-muddle, Bill. The phrase "Nostalgia ain't what it used to be" comes to mind.

I was at MOHAI (our Museum of History and Industry) on Sunday for my wife's UW Microbiology Dept Christmas brunch (don't ask). One 1919 exhibit photo in particular caught my eye. I managed to find it online. See http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm-m ... X=1&REC=10 .

I imagine my 1927 house was built using wood from a similar stack (albeit fir), but it's the height that amazes me for all sorts of reasons; wind, seismic, not to mention the logistics and safety.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. You don't realize the height of that stack until you notice the guy standing about a third of the way up. I know that people were marginally shorter then, but still...

Not sure I wanted to see the re-muddle, Bill. The phrase "Nostalgia ain't what it used to be" comes to mind.

I was at MOHAI (our Museum of History and Industry) on Sunday for my wife's UW Microbiology Dept Christmas brunch (don't ask). One 1919 exhibit photo in particular caught my eye. I managed to find it online. See http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm-m ... X=1&REC=10 .

I imagine my 1927 house was built using wood from a similar stack (albeit fir), but it's the height that amazes me for all sorts of reasons; wind, seismic, not to mention the logistics and safety.

50 foot tall stacks of cedar. Old growth clear cedar that is. That guy is standing on one of the steps to the top, where he would no doubt be guiding sling loads from a big overhead crane. The blurb says they would stack the wood for 9 months. Also mentions a big fire in the 50's.

The old general store is waiting for a restoration of the windows, for sure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...