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I found a ground wire attached to a clamp on a water line from the boiler today. I have seen them attached to plumbing lines, but never a heat line. I guess the path is there eventually as the heat pipes will eventually connect with the water line, and there was a jumper over the water meter. But I don't think this is a proper termination for the ground. Am I being too picky?

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I wouldn't depend on the conductivity of the boiler to ground the remaining plumbing in the house. Service on the boiler might interrupt the ground connection, sending the plumber to the loo.

Marc

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Of course, the grounding electrode conductor has to connect to the water service pipe within 5' of the place where it enters the building. You're supposed to ground other metal piping systems that are likely to be energized. I wouldn't have a problem with grounding the heating pipes, but not just the heating pipes.

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I think you are seeing the bonding strap which is required to prevent stray voltages from shocking people. The jumper is there to bond the two lengths of pipe.

If you call it bonding, it becomes clear, the grounding is provided by another conductor coming from a rod or a connection to the foundation.

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