Jump to content

Date of an Insulator


Recommended Posts

You folks have proved very helpful in the past with my Museum Research questions, and I'm back with another.

I'm currently researching and cataloguing this screw type multi-skirt power line pole insulator. (Please correct my terminology, BTW, as I'm making up my own terms out of ignorance of the correct ones.)

1999-004-001_zps983bf583.jpg

1999-004-001Obverse_zps885b01c4.jpg

Could you please tell me the Voltage Range for an insulator such as this (My guess = 30-40KV) and the date (I know the screw base was discontinued, but don't know the time-frame.)

Many thanks for consideration.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mark: Not stacked, as there is a thread in the center for fixing to a power pole. I based my guess on voltage on the modern example on the power line outside our home (subdivision developed in the late 1990s) This pic is of one of three identical lines on cross trees on the power pole.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2014523115218_Line%20Pole%20Insulators%20Pictou%20c%201998.jpg

15.76 KB

Link to post
Share on other sites

You folks have proved very helpful in the past with my Museum Research questions, and I'm back with another.

We only know about stuff in and on buildings. I've collected a few as a kid riding a dirt bike along old RR right-of-ways.

There are serious collectors of telegraph, phone and power line insulators. I've talked with some fanatics that mentioned there are published guides and even collectors' clubs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I have no idea of the age but unless they were installed in stacks, it would likely handle no more than 2,400 volts line to ground, probably less.

Marc

Those in particular can go to at least 8kv phase to ground, possibly 15kv phase to ground if designed so. Smaller pin types usually only go to 5kv phase to ground.

I frequently call those bowl insulators. They aren't meant to stack, rather they go unto a metal threaded pin often found on cross arms. A wire or rubber "tie down" is used to hold the wire in place.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...