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Should Ideal 61-059 Remotely Trip This Type Of RO?


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Question: Should my Ideal 61-059 remotely trip a GFCI receptacle outlet upstream from an ungrounded standard receptacle outlet?

There were a bunch of ungrounded 3-slotted wall outlets downstream from a GFCI receptacle outlet supposedly protected circuit at my inspection yesterday. (these were labeled as ungrounded & GFCI protected)

NOTE: I was able to cut the power to the ungrounded wall outlets by pushing the test button....I just want to ensure that I accurately describe these as GFCI protected or not.

Thanks in advance!

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The way I understand it is that the receptacles downstream from the GFCI have some protection for faults between neutral and hot.

But they still have no ground, so the remote tester won't trip the breaker in the GFCI. The remote tester shorts hot to the ground pin through a resistor.

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No.

The tester shunts current to ground to create the disparity between the current carrying conductor and the grounded conductor.

The GFCI test button shunts current from the CCC to the GC through a resistor. If the GFCI trips with the test button and the downstream receptacles go dead, all is well.

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The way I understand it is that the receptacles downstream from the GFCI have some protection for faults between neutral and hot.

I don't think so. A GFCI is for ground faults only.

But they still have no ground, so the remote tester won't trip the breaker in the GFCI. The remote tester shorts hot to the ground pin through a resistor.

Makes sense.

Marc

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The tester shunts current to ground to create the disparity between the current carrying conductor and the grounded conductor.

Agreed.

The GFCI test button shunts current from the CCC to the GC through a resistor. If the GFCI trips with the test button and the downstream receptacles go dead, all is well.

Ungrounded current carrying conductor only, although the 'test button' circuitry within the GFCI device might be a little different than the HI's tester and trip when either the grounded CCC or the ungrounded CCC lose current to the EGC.

That's probably what you meant anyway. Just a clarification.

Marc

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Just a FYI -

The only approved method of testing GFCI devices is the use of the test button on the device. The manufactures and UL only rate /test GFCI devices using the test button,thus they only recognize the use of the test button.

Exactly!

Testers are nice, but not to be relied upon for everything.

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The way I understand it is that the receptacles downstream from the GFCI have some protection for faults between neutral and hot.

Not exactly. GFIs do not look for bolted faults, such as between hot and neutral. They looks for a difference in current between hot and neutral. You can still have a "ground" fault even if no grounding conductor is present in the box.

But they still have no ground, so the remote tester won't trip the breaker in the GFCI. The remote tester shorts hot to the ground pin through a resistor.

True, but it is not a good idea to call the trip mechanism in a GFI a "breaker". This is a definite misnomer.
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Question: Should my Ideal 61-059 remotely trip a GFCI receptacle outlet upstream from an ungrounded standard receptacle outlet?

There were a bunch of ungrounded 3-slotted wall outlets downstream from a GFCI receptacle outlet supposedly protected circuit at my inspection yesterday. (these were labeled as ungrounded & GFCI protected)

NOTE: I was able to cut the power to the ungrounded wall outlets by pushing the test button....I just want to ensure that I accurately describe these as GFCI protected or not.

Thanks in advance!

In the case you described, tripping the circuit by using the button on the GFI receptacle then checking down stream to see which other receptacles lost power is the correct way (on un-grounded circuits) to determine if the downstream receptacles are GFI protected.

I think you did it correctly.

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