Jump to content

Need a stucco disclaimer.


Recommended Posts

Need a stucco disclaimer. 2 sentences that says there may be rot, but i can't see it. Can anybody improve this basic disclaimer below?

This is a visual inspection only. For a complete Stucco inspection of wall cavities, etc., consult a stucco inspector.

Consult with? Contact?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Need a stucco disclaimer. 2 sentences that says there may be rot, but i can't see it. Can anybody improve this basic disclaimer below?

This is a visual inspection only. For a complete Stucco inspection of wall cavities, etc., consult a stucco inspector.

Consult with? Contact?

I think you need to explain why a visual inspection of stucco might need to supplemented. We know this, but a typical buyer might not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How about a recommendation of sorts instead of a disclaimer?

Regarding the stucco exterior finish, I did not see any water intrusion evidence on the day of the inspection. However, this does not mean that it will not ever happen. Therein lies the importance of proper flashing and water drainage details. Have a qualified stucco specialist review this installation to deem and implement necessary corrections for water intrusion prevention.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I am with you there, but I would want to replace 'deem and implement' 'water intrusion pevention' Sorry, but that won't fly with some of my clients. Lost them there.

[:)]

"There is some surface staining on the stucco from runoff, but I could not determine if moisture has leaked in behind the stucco and the housewrap.

Moisture trapped behind the stucco can cause damage to the wood sheathing and framing.

If this is a concern, have a qualifed stucco inspector use specialized equipment to inspect the sheathing for damage behind the stucco."

Link to post
Share on other sites
I didn't see any rot on the stucco exterior finish, but usually when it happens, it's on the wall sheathing behind the stucco layer where I can't see it. Discovering it requires intrusive methods which are outside the scope of what I do. You should ask a stucco contractor to do that for you and report on any such rot.

Three sentences.

Marc

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see any rot on the stucco exterior finish, but usually when it happens, it's on the wall sheathing behind the stucco layer where I can't see it. Discovering it requires intrusive methods which are outside the scope of what I do. You should ask a stucco contractor to do that for you and report on any such rot.

Three sentences.

Marc

Three is OK, per Jim, the one added sentence to explain that I can't see behind the stucco where the trouble would be.

You got that but I would change "I didn't see rot" to "damage". Stucco doesn't rot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see any rot on the stucco exterior finish, but usually when it happens, it's on the wall sheathing behind the stucco layer where I can't see it. Discovering it requires intrusive methods which are outside the scope of what I do. You should ask a stucco contractor to do that for you and report on any such rot.

Three sentences.

Marc

This tells them to look for problems but it doesn't tell them to fix them if found. If there is water damage behind stucco caused by water from exterior intrusion, it's because there's installation details that are wrong.

A trial attorney would be all over that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see any rot on the stucco exterior finish, but usually when it happens, it's on the wall sheathing behind the stucco layer where I can't see it. Discovering it requires intrusive methods which are outside the scope of what I do. You should ask a stucco contractor to do that for you and report on any such rot.

Three sentences.

Marc

This tells them to look for problems but it doesn't tell them to fix them if found. If there is water damage behind stucco caused by water from exterior intrusion, it's because there's installation details that are wrong.

A trial attorney would be all over that.

The damage is not always so serious that the stucco needs to be ripped off for a repair. It could be a couple brown drip lines. I'd leave it to the stucco contractor to decide on a repair recommendation since only he actually sees the damage, if any.

Marc

Link to post
Share on other sites

. . . This tells them to look for problems but it doesn't tell them to fix them if found. If there is water damage behind stucco caused by water from exterior intrusion, it's because there's installation details that are wrong.

A trial attorney would be all over that.

A trial attorney would be all over any part of any report that anyone writes. That's what trial attorneys do. If we try to write our reports in an attempt to make them trial-attorney-proof, we'll end up writing lousy reports.

Instead, strive to make your meaning clear to a lay person.

Link to post
Share on other sites

. . . This tells them to look for problems but it doesn't tell them to fix them if found. If there is water damage behind stucco caused by water from exterior intrusion, it's because there's installation details that are wrong.

A trial attorney would be all over that.

A trial attorney would be all over any part of any report that anyone writes. That's what trial attorneys do. If we try to write our reports in an attempt to make them trial-attorney-proof, we'll end up writing lousy reports.

Instead, strive to make your meaning clear to a lay person.

Point well taken.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

During this inspection, water damage was noted ((where?) / in various locations.). This type of cladding consists of components that cannot be evaluated without specialized testing beyond the scope of this inspection. There may be additional damage that was not detected. I recommend a full Certified Stucco Inspection and evaluation by a Building Envelope Inspector / Moisture Analyst.

or

Although during this inspection no indication of water intrusion was noted, this type of cladding consists of components that cannot be evaluated without specialized testing beyond the scope of this inspection. There may be damage that was not detected. I recommend a full Certified Stucco Inspection and evaluation by a Building Envelope Inspector / Moisture Analyst.

You could also warn your clients to beware of stucco inspections based on thermal imaging [mainly]. It is not reliable .

Link to post
Share on other sites

In our area, NE Florida, we have tons of wood frame stucco homes. Many have significant water intrusion issues. Below you will find comments that we use in my company on every wood frame stucco house. I don't believe that a couple of sentences can address the risk with stucco, or at a minimum, relaying to a home buyer the limitations of our inspections.

"This is a wood frame home with a hard coat stucco type finish (we are unable to determine the thickness and number of layers during a visual home inspection). It appears that the home has a mechanically attached lathing, cement base coat and either a synthetic, shell, or painted finish. Cement based stucco systems are designed to drain water if the system gets wet on the outside of the self-furring lathing and builders paper. The finish is supposed to dry to the outside (exterior) or drain down to the bottom weep screed or stucco stop. We also need to consider face sealing the finish system in certain areas to keep water out, as such it is important to keep all through the wall penetrations; windows, visible flashing, doors, hosebibbs, and electrical connections sealed against water intrusion (these are areas where the original construction flashing details cannot be seen or observed and are often behind the stucco finish system). Additionally, if cracks occur and/or if water intrusion is detected immediate corrective action is recommended. Intrusive wall examinations have not been conducted."

We have recently started using the following on new construction.

"ADDITIONAL STUCCO COMMENTS. Application of plaster stucco is intended to follow two specific National Standards, ASTM C926-14a and C1063-14c. While the majority of these two documents are followed there are several items that are not adhered to in our geographic area; head flashings over lower level windows on two story construction, weep provisions at second floor projections, and casing beads at penetrations and/or dissimilar materials. We cannot answer why these important details are ignored, we can only alert you that they are missing. Care is needed to ensure that you have proper rain control provisions (rain gutters and s crack free, sealed finish) and that you monitor your exterior finishes for proper performance on a routine basis."

Charles

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...