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Hello, is there a code violation here. Is a furnace considered a combustible. I would think that there is some requirement as to clearance from gas piping at the least. Also, would carpet over a concrete basement slab be considered combustible? Manufacturers installation requirements say 8 inches of non combustible flooring extending at the backside. The sides and front are ok. Thanks!

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The plastic water softener salt bin, the carpet at the back. The front and sides look wrong, are you SURE there's enough clearance?

Also, what about the flue and chimney? Given what I'm seeing, you're not tying into the same flue as the water heater and furnace, are you?

I'd be most comfortable if you'd call in a professional, either fireplace contractor or inspector. There's more to look at than just clearance to combustibles.

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The front is fine, nothing even close there. It's about 14 inches from the nearest point of the stove to the furnace. The requirement per manufacturers installation guidelines is 18 inches from the sides to combustibles. The distance from the stove to the water softener is 18 inches. I know it does not look it in the pictures. The wood stove has its' own dedicated flue pipe. not tied into furnace or water heater at all. I need to know if the sheetmetal furnace cabinet is considered a combustible surface, or if there is a gas pipe requirement.

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What could go wrong?

At best, a stove that size, loaded with locust, hickory, or dried oak, would probably max out at around 900 degrees on contact.

I can see a fire extinguisher! [;)]

The shelf full of paint behind it, is also a nice idea.

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The stove could be pulled forward a few inches. Maybe it was forward originally. They really should get rid of the carpet. A metal heat shield could be installed to guard the PVC pipe.

I would say no it won't pass as is and it needs an inspection certificate for insurance purposes. I advise them to correct the installation first, and then have it inspected.

Those stoves get very hot on top, but don't forget the sides and back are brick-lined and shielded with extra baffles.

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Hello, is there a code violation here. Is a furnace considered a combustible.

Certainly not. The condensate drain is, but I'd just replace that section of it with copper.

I would think that there is some requirement as to clearance from gas piping at the least.

Nope.

Also, would carpet over a concrete basement slab be considered combustible?

Only if it's special non-combustible (listed) carpet.

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...very funny post. Wood stoves are called solid fuel appliances...I know that out there in the midwest you get no leadership from state levels re codes, but generally speaking, residential codes want three feet clearance to combustibiles. Wood fire appliances can get hot enough to fire pottery! In fact, I know a potter in my area who fuels his kiln to 2500+ degrees with wood...think about it...

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I agree. 18" isn't enough, even if the mfg. says it is. 3', or a shield.

Sorry but 3 feet puts the stove out in the middle of the room, like an old cast iron pot belly. These new stoves are shielded I tell you. The manufacturers have been testing them for 30 years or more. If there is a danger at 18", somebody, a Ralph Nader type, would be screaming to the world about it.
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Is that a new stove? I can't tell.

It is a Napolean, a discontinued model maybe but not real old.

The manuals are available from their website.

The floor protection at the back should be at least 8" wide, per the manual for a similar model. Greyboy had it right.

http://www.napoleonproducts.com/downloa ... 5-0762.pdf Floor protection is on page 10.

Check out the cutaway pics of this stove. Firebrick and multiple heat shields around the sides and extra shielding on the back. That is not to say that you can't get the top red hot, but the sides and back will be cooler.

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