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This house or used Chevy Truck?


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This house just sticks in my mind. Looked at it last week for a bank and really had a hard time pulling away and leaving it alone again.

it is on a couple acres, at the outskirts of a very small town near Lansing. Listed for less than a 2012 Chevy Truck and likely could be bought for even less.

Sad but very beautiful.

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I apologize to the people that think this sort of building should be razed. If I were a tad younger and so inclined to labor, I'd buy this in a minute!

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The exterior is in about the same shape as mine when I bought it. The interior is actually quite a bit nicer. $25000 in 1999. I'm $70 K into it now, about 3/4 finished. Its worth about $55K. If the market recovery and my completion date align I just might break even.

I would be in much better shape if I had put $25 into a $75K house, but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun.

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I'd agree with Chad. the records in this part of Michigan usually show a house built prior to 1900 as 1900 and not the actual date. The reason was tax reform occurred and the age was only important from 1900 onward.

The kitchen was split as is often the case here into a "wash room" and a preparation room. Also the bathroom was accessible from the exterior and the interior. The bath had a primitive stool, but usually that sort of work was done outside in an adjacent building. The bathroom had a sink, tub and stool with running water added circa 1900+-.

I have added a photo of the stone foundation because it is quite unusual; stone, cement and painted lines.

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Town location is Bancroft.

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Is that paint, or is it a "tuck", as in tuckpointing? If it's an actual tuck point, I might fall in love.

Looks like tuck pointing. I see foundations like that several times most weeks.

Many people use the term tuck pointing for repointing brick. I'm not sure why they use it. Of course, many Realtors call any window with a half round top a Palladian window (or Palladium).

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Yep, the terms are completely bastardized.

Interestingly, there is a PhD dissertation by a guy out in Oregon getting his doctorate in historic architecture (or something like that) that traced the bastardization of the term to Chicago; the mopes in my city started using the term interchangeably with just about any smearing of cement on masonry.

There's very little actual tuckpointing in Chicago; a few places, but that's about it.

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Here is a better shot of the stonework. the paint was almost like a paste (thick). Was not applied with a brush or if it was applied with a brush then it had to be a stencil brush or a true sash brush and some sort of template.

Chicago has the greatest rules for all trades - they are all unique. I learned about their tuckpointing when I tried to have some caulking done on a brick building on the west side. Had to interview with the local alderman before I could talk to his couisin, that referred me to his nephew that knew a woman that had a son that was a fireman that did that work on his Kelley days.

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I'd call that quasi tuckpointing. It doesn't look like there is an actual tuck; it's just smeared on cementitious glop to make it look like those old fieldstones are fit tight with uniform joints.

It's still a pretty cool house, though.

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I'd call that quasi tuckpointing. It doesn't look like there is an actual tuck; it's just smeared on cementitious glop to make it look like those old fieldstones are fit tight with uniform joints.

It's still a pretty cool house, though.

That is very cool to think that the stones are laid up like brick with not much mortar between. It's funny they were embarassed about the stone and tried to hide it.
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It wasn't so much trying to hide as it was a way to make it look like uniform joints.

Tuckpointing was originally used on non uniform sized brick as a means to camouflage the somewhat uneven joints. Then the design became a style, and then the term got bastardized into all sorts of meanings.

Or something like that. I've read and heard a lot of variations on that general line of thought.

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