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JPLomeo

Raised trim at tread is trip hazard- IRC ?

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That's when an author uses additional words, like trip and fall, or burning, or health, or life safety.

Indicating a location finishes the process.

I guess if folks choose to not understand common words almost exclusively associated with describing risks, that is there prerogative.

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I guess if folks choose to not understand common words almost exclusively associated with describing risks, that is there prerogative.

Their, There, They're Kurt. It'll be alright. Some people use one word to describe things, others use a few more, and there's always those who have to use lots of big words to describe simple things.

[:-monkeyd[:-monkeyd[:-monkeyd

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In advanced societies, folks develop words to describe things like conditions that could cause someone to trip or fall and be injured.

These same advanced societies have books of words that describe things. They're called dictionaries. If one looks in a dictionary, one will see that the single word "hazard" very accurately describes that condition that some folks choose to describe in entire sentences that provide no more clarity than the single simple word. I suppose there is the advantage of sounding like one is conversing with a 9 year old.

To each their own....

Oh, for Pete's sake, come on!

One word doesn't communicate that condition even decently.

Out with the brain fart.[;)]

Marc

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Erby, hazard isn't a big word and I wasn't implying complicated verbiage is preferable. You know that.

Marc, I have no idea what you're talking about. If you read the sentence, you will find I recommend using a minimal number of small words that are used almost universally to describe the condition we're talking about.

I mean, are folks really flummoxed by the word *hazard*? Is it a complicated word? Is it hard to understand? Is it really the same as a media talking head talking about crises? When used in conjunction with "trip and fall" relative to a location, is this a confused and imprecise pile of verbiage?

I expect this sort of stuff from Eric; he manages to come up with all sorts of personalized cosmologies related to this thing we do, but I thought this place was the bedrock or rational thought. I'm most surprised that Katen, bedrock soul of concise language usage, is going out on a limb.

Are we now using "There's a bump on the nosing of the tread that is dangerous; it could cause someone to trip, fall, and injure themselves" as the model of concise language? We aren't supposed to use the language that is universally associated with these sorts of risks?

I hope not. I expect some sense out of you guys, and you're not making any.

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...

Are we now using "There's a bump on the nosing of the tread that is dangerous; it could cause someone to trip, fall, and injure themselves" as the model of concise language?

Yep.

But like you said, 'to each their own'.

Fair enough?

Marc

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Not looking for balance or fairness. I'm looking for what people think.

Apparently, folks think words that are simple, precise, and about as standard within an industry as any word can possibly be, are now determined by a small number of practitioners to be imprecise and confusing and equivalent to boneheaded TV talking headspeak.

Like I said, everyone gets to do whatever they want. I'm just surprised by what folks want on this one.

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Not looking for balance or fairness. I'm looking for what people think.

Apparently, folks think words that are simple, precise, and about as standard within an industry as any word can possibly be, are now determined by a small number of practitioners to be imprecise and confusing and equivalent to boneheaded TV talking headspeak.

Like I said, everyone gets to do whatever they want. I'm just surprised by what folks want on this one.

Agreed.

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Are we now using "There's a bump on the nosing of the tread that is dangerous; it could cause someone to trip, fall, and injure themselves" as the model of concise language? We aren't supposed to use the language that is universally associated with these sorts of risks?

Uh oh! Now I'm flummoxed by the word "bump". [;)]

It's probably just me but "hazard" is a bit strong.

I don't think it's just you. I'm sure thousands of agents would agree.

Let's look at the big picture. A chimpanzee should know better than to use that crap on a staircase. It's a product made for Joe homeowner to impress his bride with. It eats saw blades, is always slippery, blows up like a tampon when the family dog expresses their opinion of your work, and it has no soul.

A guy who calls himself a builder and uses that junk for something bare minimalist builders of yesteryear, would take pride in spending the extra time and loot on, the only permanent furniture piece in any home, is the real hazard.

Hope you could see what was holding that ugly mess in the air. Staircase, my a$$.

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Kurt, I know you were going for simplicity. I was gigging you on "there".

I'm with Bill.

X is a fire hazard

X is a shock hazard

Dipshit stair nosing is a faceplant hazard.

Let's look at the big picture. A chimpanzee should know better than to use that crap on a staircase. It's a product made for Joe homeowner to impress his bride with. It eats saw blades, is always slippery, blows up like a tampon when the family dog expresses their opinion of your work, and it has no soul.

Now THAT is some funny stuff!

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Gary Wins!

I did look at several of our reports done during the past months and found very few places we used the word hazard with out an adjective. We are not "big" on hazards and the like.

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I used "ill-conceived" to describe the waste plumbing system in yesterday's report. In the same report I suggested the roofer was "thoughtless" because he lined up the edges of the the starter strip with the edges of the 1st course all the way around the house.

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I was rushed to the hospital by ambulance and spent 11 days there before being sent to an inpatient TCU facility for rehabilitation.

This was most definitely 100% THE DIRECT CAUSE of this horrible raised nose on our new staircaise!

HAZARDOUS IS AN UNDERSTATEMENT!

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Well, Tammie, I'm glad your back to enough health to come here on your research path.

 

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