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Expandable foam at SEC panel entry


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I don't think there's an overheating issue but it does remind me of AC guys who punch a hole in cast iron vent stacks to run their condensate line into.

You're supposed to use the proper fitting. They're called seal fittings in the oil field.

Marc

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Think they were trying to stop water, or just an air sealer going nuts?

There was no signs of water. I usually see the entry stuffed with a gray putty.

An enclosure needs to "be free of easily ignitable material". I'd call it out.

I did not think of that. Is there a definition of, "easily ignitable material?"

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Think they were trying to stop water, or just an air sealer going nuts?

There was no signs of water. I usually see the entry stuffed with a gray putty.

An enclosure needs to "be free of easily ignitable material". I'd call it out.

I did not think of that. Is there a definition of, "easily ignitable material?"

Good question, they should have specified a flammability rating. However, I just did a little research and found out some of the foams have flame retardant. I got this off the American Chemistry Council's website;

Does the cured sealant pose a fire hazard? Is it flammable?

Insulating foam sealants typically contain flame retardants and when installed properly, are designed to meet all applicable building and fire code regulations Installed cured product is combustible and will typically begin to thermally degrade at temperatures above 240?F/116?C. In addition, the unreacted chemical constituents in the can may be combustible, so you should carefully read the instructions on the product label and follow them with respect to avoiding installations in areas exposed to high heat, such as around fireplaces, heaters, radiators, heat lamps, recessed lighting, bare copper wires, or inside electrical boxes.

So I guess we need to find the used can and read the label;)

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I think one of the grand arbiters of questions like 'Is this material easily ignitable?' in the US is the UL testing protocols and listings. ASTM too... They put numbers to the flame spread and smoke generation characteristics (optical density) for various products and materials that are presented to them for their published testing procedures. When I used to work for Ma Bell and her children we would submit cable designs for the infamous Steiner Tunnel Test (UL 723 I think)

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Mike, The foam alone is not going to cause overheating. If overheating did occur there'd be another problem going on independent of the foam. Even it the conduit was stuffed with yesterday's Tribune I probably won't get too concerned. But then again I don't wear a cape and mask trying to save everyone from all kinds trivial issues.

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Mike, The foam alone is not going to cause overheating.

I asked. Now I think I know.

Even it the conduit was stuffed with yesterday's Tribune I probably won't get too concerned.

How about last week's Tribune?

But then again I don't wear a cape and mask trying to save everyone from all kinds trivial issues.

Translate that. Is this supposed to have something to do with the OP or something else?

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