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GFCI Protection in kitchen


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Funny, I am currently designing a wiring plan for a kitchen. I was considering including the gas range receptacle in my MWBC of counter top circuit. I asked an electrician who said to ask the inspector.

In NY, most electrical inspectors are independent. I'll let you know what my guy says, but it may not apply anywhere else.

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A gas range has a digital clock on the control panel and a light bulb in the oven. A dedicated circuit is wasteful.

I agree.

from memory...

I believe that if it is plugged into an outlet that is GFCI protected it may be OK but hard wired requires a dedicated circuit. Of course you also have to follow the manufacturer's published specs as well.

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And now of course the dishwasher and receptacles within 6 feet of the sink (including under the sink, frig, range, cooktop etc) also have to be GFCI protected---and AFCI protected for that matter. Easiest to do it with a dual function breaker in the panel probably.

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When tripped, the GFCI wall receptacle in the kitchen yesterday was found to protect the oven/range circuit, the garbage disposer circuit, and the microwave oven/fan circuit. Why do I find that odd (personality quibbles aside)?

The GFCI small appliance circuit at the kitchen countertop may also provide power to a gas range. It shouldn't be providing power to a disposer, a microwave, or a range hood.

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I agree with Jim about the disposer. That cannot be on the small appliance circuit. The MW should not be (IMO), but I'm not certain whether it is permitted. I'd have to look that up.

If it's a countertop model, then you can plug it into a countertop receptacle.

If it's a permanently installed unit, such as a range hood/micro combination, then it's not supposed to be on the small appliance branch circuit.

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Ask someone on Thanksgiving cooking a turkey ... GFCI decides to quit... no turkey... Bad ju ju..

On another related topic, when I test-trip GFCIs in kitchens (with the 'test' button on the outlet), I also open the fridge to make sure the fridge is not GFCI protected... I've caught a few.. :)

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P

Ask someone on Thanksgiving cooking a turkey ... GFCI decides to quit... no turkey... Bad ju ju..

On another related topic, when I test-trip GFCIs in kitchens (with the 'test' button on the outlet), I also open the fridge to make sure the fridge is not GFCI protected... I've caught a few.. :)

There is no issue if it is protected. It is allowed by code.

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In my country at least, the fridge is supposed to be on a dedicated circuit, what Rob says. Why, because it loads down the circuit when it kicks in, and we traditionally had 15 amp kitchen circuits. Since 2006, 20 amps is allowed and better than 15 amp split-duplex. That's in Canada, and we are united electrically. None of these different rules for where you happen to live. [:)]

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