Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I might be returning an inspection fee due to omitting a proper description of a material makeup. First time in 9 years of inspecting. It has to do with a section of PVC piping on the cold side leading to the water heater. Copper snubs out of the water heater. There was no failure but a plumber refused to change out the water heater because of the PVC dist piping inside the house.

I'm going out to have a look tomorrow and speak with the client about solutions. In the event we agree to have me return the fee, I want a release form to use. If any of you have a suitable form for this purpose, please post it so I can consider using it.

Live and learn.....

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

PVC isn't permitted for fresh water lines in Maryland?

Marc

I might be alright. I spoke with a master plumber who says the pressure PVC is ok on the cold side. We'll see how things turn out.

I've never seen PVC listed as acceptable for distribution inside a building. It is only listed for use in supplying water to the building.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the release form language I'll use if the conclusion is to return the fee.

It looks like some local codes accept PVC as distribution pipe on the cold side within the structure. I'll be calling my local AHJ to see. But here is an example of another area that accepts it.

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/adm ... 96aaR.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went back and inspected the conditions which caused the plumber to refuse installing the water heater. Most of the PVC was still in the "service line" category, even though it wasn't that much. However, whoever added the basement bathroom t'd off and ran PVC on the cold side only to the fixtures close by. All that was up behind ceiling tiles which I did not move during the initial inspection. Anyway, to settle the matter so I could sleep better I offered a refund of the inspection fee and the client accepted.

As for what is truly service piping and what is distribution piping, what is the determining factors? I ask this because I see PVC service pipe from wells running through basements before getting to the well tank. I would like to know for sure, when do I call a pipe a service pipe and when do I call it a distribution pipe?

If a service pipe can run through a structure to a well tank and still be called a service pipe, can it run to a water heater and be called the same?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went back and inspected the conditions which caused the plumber to refuse installing the water heater. Most of the PVC was still in the "service line" category, even though it wasn't that much. However, whoever added the basement bathroom t'd off and ran PVC on the cold side only to the fixtures close by. All that was up behind ceiling tiles which I did not move during the initial inspection. Anyway, to settle the matter so I could sleep better I offered a refund of the inspection fee and the client accepted.

As for what is truly service piping and what is distribution piping, what is the determining factors? I ask this because I see PVC service pipe from wells running through basements before getting to the well tank. I would like to know for sure, when do I call a pipe a service pipe and when do I call it a distribution pipe?

If a service pipe can run through a structure to a well tank and still be called a service pipe, can it run to a water heater and be called the same?

In our area, the service pipe stops two feet outside of the foundation wall. Even if it's the same pipe, it stops being service pipe and becomes distribution pipe after that. PVC isn't allowed as distribution pipe in a building or under it in my area. Cold or hot doesn't matter. No PVC inside or under the building.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe IRC & IPC both state that plastic 'service' piping can only be inside a building for a maximum of 5' feet beyond the point of entry. This is mostly strictly enforced in the areas I cover. It's usually a short run to the meter or HN tank from the point of entry and then switches to piping approved for distribution.

The service pipe from wells in this area is always HDPE, unless it's really old, then it's galv. steel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of approved by AHJ, I actually called the head of plumbing inspection for the county in question. He told me that if PVC ran straight to the cold side of the water heater without teeing off from another location I could consider it service pipe. He said that once you tee off, then you're in distribution. He didn't seem to have a concern with what I described to him, unless there was a T that sent more PVC to another location. But the main line coming in and moving through the structure, he claimed as service pipe, which PVC is on the list and thereby approved.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...