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I do reinspections now and then. Many times I'm looking at a repair order list where the issues I'm supposed to inspect again have morphed into something different than I had originally called out. I'm sure you might get this too. What's your experience with this?

Here are the most recent morphs I've had.

Concern written in report;

The auxiliary backup electric coils in the furnace were tested by bypassing the heat pump using the thermostatic controls. Sufficient time was allowed for the system to ramp up but it failed to deliver an adequate heat supply. Further investigation is needed by a qualified contractor to determine the cause so that repairs can be made.

Response from seller;

"The Trane unit outside is just a few years old and inside a brand new motor was just placed in the air handler in 2015. Both were tested then and have worked flawlessly".

Concern written in report;

A difference in water supply volume was recognized on the day of the inspection. While running the water at the fixtures an inconsistent volume was present. The volume changed significantly when more than one fixture was turned on at the same time. The systems of the well pump and well pressure tank should be further investigated by a qualified plumber to determine the cause of the inconsistent supply of water volume so that adjustments or repairs can be made.

Response from seller;

"The water pressure will decrease in pressure when using several water sources but this is true for any home on a well that does not have a continuous water pressure system. The pressure tank is only around three years old. It hasn't been an issue for us but I will make some psi adjustments to the pressure tank and pressure switch to help with this".

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I do reinspections now and then. Many times I'm looking at a repair order list where the issues I'm supposed to inspect again have morphed into something different than I had originally called out. I'm sure you might get this too. What's your experience with this?

Here are the most recent morphs I've had.

Concern written in report;

The auxiliary backup electric coils in the furnace were tested by bypassing the heat pump using the thermostatic controls. Sufficient time was allowed for the system to ramp up but it failed to deliver an adequate heat supply. Further investigation is needed by a qualified contractor to determine the cause so that repairs can be made.

Electric backup is a fail or pass thing, it works or it doesn't. I wouldn't bother with commenting on the adequacy of the backup heat.

Response from seller;

"The Trane unit outside is just a few years old and inside a brand new motor was just placed in the air handler in 2015. Both were tested then and have worked flawlessly".

This is meaningless except that this seller is pissed.

Concern written in report;

A difference in water supply volume was recognized on the day of the inspection. While running the water at the fixtures an inconsistent volume was present. The volume changed significantly when more than one fixture was turned on at the same time. The systems of the well pump and well pressure tank should be further investigated by a qualified plumber to determine the cause of the inconsistent supply of water volume so that adjustments or repairs can be made.

I think you meant to say 'water flow rate'. Perhaps the cut-out, cut-in settings on the pressure switch needs adjustment. That happens every couple years on my own water well.

Response from seller;

"The water pressure will decrease in pressure when using several water sources but this is true for any home on a well that does not have a continuous water pressure system. The pressure tank is only around three years old. It hasn't been an issue for us but I will make some psi adjustments to the pressure tank and pressure switch to help with this".

You got a pissed seller.

Requests for re-inspections are rare in my case. It's been more years than I can remember since the last one.

Marc

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In my experience, I've never seen multi-staged backup heat. What I've always seen is multiple electric elements. The installer connects whatever he sees fit, assuming there's enough power coming in from the panel. So yeah, If you've got two elements wired up for backup duty and one fails then there would be only half the heat on backup mode.

You're the first I've ever heard that checks for that. Not that I'm knocking it. It's colder where you are so maybe it's justified.

Marc

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In my experience, I've never seen multi-staged backup heat. What I've always seen is multiple electric elements. The installer connects whatever he sees fit, assuming there's enough power coming in from the panel. So yeah, If you've got two elements wired up for backup duty and one fails then there would be only half the heat on backup mode.

You're the first I've ever heard that checks for that. Not that I'm knocking it. It's colder where you are so maybe it's justified.

Marc

It's the first think I check with a heat pump system. I go to the thermostat and put it in em heat mode. I then verify the heat pump is not running, give the system 10 or 15 mins to ramp up and check the temp at the registers. About 2 in 10 I find to have either no heat or weak heat.

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I do reinspections now and then. Many times I'm looking at a repair order list where the issues I'm supposed to inspect again have morphed into something different than I had originally called out. I'm sure you might get this too. What's your experience with this?

Here are the most recent morphs I've had.

Concern written in report;

The auxiliary backup electric coils in the furnace were tested by bypassing the heat pump using the thermostatic controls. Sufficient time was allowed for the system to ramp up but it failed to deliver an adequate heat supply. Further investigation is needed by a qualified contractor to determine the cause so that repairs can be made.

Response from seller;

"The Trane unit outside is just a few years old and inside a brand new motor was just placed in the air handler in 2015. Both were tested then and have worked flawlessly".

Your written comment is unclear. Three passive-voice sentences in a row put him to sleep. He got frustrated trying to figure out what the heck you were trying to say. Next time say, "The third electric coil from the top is broken. Replace it." Or, if you don't want to bother figuring out the exact problem, "The heat pump works fine in the heat pump mode, but not in the emergency backup mode. Ask your heating contractor to fix it."

Concern written in report;

A difference in water supply volume was recognized on the day of the inspection. While running the water at the fixtures an inconsistent volume was present. The volume changed significantly when more than one fixture was turned on at the same time. The systems of the well pump and well pressure tank should be further investigated by a qualified plumber to determine the cause of the inconsistent supply of water volume so that adjustments or repairs can be made.

Response from seller;

"The water pressure will decrease in pressure when using several water sources but this is true for any home on a well that does not have a continuous water pressure system. The pressure tank is only around three years old. It hasn't been an issue for us but I will make some psi adjustments to the pressure tank and pressure switch to help with this".

His response is much clearer than your comment. So far, I'm with him.

In general, when people don't understand what you've written, it's your fault, not theirs.

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In my experience, I've never seen multi-staged backup heat. What I've always seen is multiple electric elements. The installer connects whatever he sees fit, assuming there's enough power coming in from the panel. So yeah, If you've got two elements wired up for backup duty and one fails then there would be only half the heat on backup mode.

You're the first I've ever heard that checks for that. Not that I'm knocking it. It's colder where you are so maybe it's justified.

Marc

Most heat pumps with electric backup heat (outside of the south) are wired the way John describes. The coils come on in stages, either about 90 seconds apart (when governed by a sequencer), or in response to an outdoor thermostat and an intelligent thermostat.

I find it easiest to test them with a clamp-on meter. That way I can say with confidence which coils are coming on and which aren't. If I disconnect the suspect coils, I can even tell whether or not they're broken. The meter also makes for nice pictures, which provide a convincing narrative. Including a picture of an ammeter with "0.00" on it makes a point that's hard to argue with.

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In my experience, I've never seen multi-staged backup heat. What I've always seen is multiple electric elements. The installer connects whatever he sees fit, assuming there's enough power coming in from the panel. So yeah, If you've got two elements wired up for backup duty and one fails then there would be only half the heat on backup mode.

You're the first I've ever heard that checks for that. Not that I'm knocking it. It's colder where you are so maybe it's justified.

Marc

It's the first think I check with a heat pump system. I go to the thermostat and put it in em heat mode. I then verify the heat pump is not running, give the system 10 or 15 mins to ramp up and check the temp at the registers. About 2 in 10 I find to have either no heat or weak heat.

John,

The stages come on anywhere from seconds apart to maybe up to a minute. All stages should be on after a couple minutes. It could take longer to get a steady temperature, especially if the ducts are in an unconditioned space. This is about the only place I use an amp probe. It saves time, and I have a good idea whether there is a problem or not. Around here a small townhouse will typically have 10 kW, a medium size house 15 kW, and a large house with one system 20 kW. A small condo may have 5 kW. This can vary. Sometimes there are 2.5 kw stages, but you can usually get a better idea than just relying on temperature difference.

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Agreed, some people will only understand a blunt description of the problem. Angry sellers being some of those people. [:)]

So you stick to your guns while letting the clients and agents sort out how they will proceed.

My worst episode in that regard was checking for the multiple repairs but being followed closely by the seller. I found the crapper was still loose when I nudged it, but said nothing. A month later a wet spot was discovered under the still loose toilet. I was accused then of breaking the toilet seal, causing water damage to a ceiling. Then came visit #3, what to do? Lucky for me, my client sided with me and volunteered that he and his son planned to patch and paint, so no biggy. He wasn't going to lose the deal over a one hour patch job.

My mistake that time was allowing the seller into my little inspection circle. Das ist verboten, ja?

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I do reinspections now and then. Many times I'm looking at a repair order list where the issues I'm supposed to inspect again have morphed into something different than I had originally called out. I'm sure you might get this too. What's your experience with this?

Here are the most recent morphs I've had.

Concern written in report;

The auxiliary backup electric coils in the furnace were tested by bypassing the heat pump using the thermostatic controls. Sufficient time was allowed for the system to ramp up but it failed to deliver an adequate heat supply. Further investigation is needed by a qualified contractor to determine the cause so that repairs can be made.

Response from seller;

"The Trane unit outside is just a few years old and inside a brand new motor was just placed in the air handler in 2015. Both were tested then and have worked flawlessly".

Your written comment is unclear. Three passive-voice sentences in a row put him to sleep. He got frustrated trying to figure out what the heck you were trying to say. Next time say, "The third electric coil from the top is broken. Replace it." Or, if you don't want to bother figuring out the exact problem, "The heat pump works fine in the heat pump mode, but not in the emergency backup mode. Ask your heating contractor to fix it."

Concern written in report;

A difference in water supply volume was recognized on the day of the inspection. While running the water at the fixtures an inconsistent volume was present. The volume changed significantly when more than one fixture was turned on at the same time. The systems of the well pump and well pressure tank should be further investigated by a qualified plumber to determine the cause of the inconsistent supply of water volume so that adjustments or repairs can be made.

Response from seller;

"The water pressure will decrease in pressure when using several water sources but this is true for any home on a well that does not have a continuous water pressure system. The pressure tank is only around three years old. It hasn't been an issue for us but I will make some psi adjustments to the pressure tank and pressure switch to help with this".

His response is much clearer than your comment. So far, I'm with him.

In general, when people don't understand what you've written, it's your fault, not theirs.

I stand Katenized, again. I'm sure it wont be the last time.

Thanks Jim, I'll work on clarifying my comments.

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